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" I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem... "
Essays and Poems - Page 34
by Jones Very - 1839 - 175 pages
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Essays Biographical and Critical: Chiefly on English Poets

David Masson - 1856 - 475 pages
...lecturer, as sure as fate, a rebuke, though from young lips, that would have made his old face blush. " He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem:" — fancy that sentence — an early and often pronounced formula of Milton's, as we may be sure it...
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A Collection of Familiar Quotations: With Complete Indices of Authors and ...

John Bartlett - 1856 - 358 pages
...bright countenance of truth in the quiet and still air of delightful studies. Apology for Smectymnuss. He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem. Tract of Education. I shall detain you no longer in the demonstration of what we should not do, but...
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The American Journal of Education, Volume 2

Henry Barnard - 1856
...of Lycidas and Comus ; and above all, moulding and consolidating his own character and life into " a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honorablest things." Of this period of his life, in his apology, Milton says, — "My morning haunts are, where they should...
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The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 74

1894
...entrusted to him, he seems to have said to himself, like Milton : •• I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...best and honorablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men or famous cities, unless he have in himself the experience and practice...
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The Rifle, Axe, and Saddle-bags, and Other Lectures

William Henry Milburn - 1857 - 285 pages
...pure thoughts without transgression. And long it was not after, when I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter, in things laudable, ought himself to oe a true poem; that is a composition and pattern of the best and...
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The Standard Fifth Reader: (first-class Standard Reader) : for Public and ...

Epes Sargent - 1857 - 478 pages
...the conviction " that he who would not be frustrate/ofnis hope to write well hereafter in lauuabTei things, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern ofjjhc best and honorablest things ; " and from this he never Bwen'tar Tlis life was indeed a true...
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The Rifle, Axe, and Saddle-bags, and Other Lectures

William Henry Milburn - 1857 - 285 pages
...to write well hereafter, in things laudable, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is a'composition and pattern of the best and honorablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless that he gave himself experience and practice of...
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Cambridge Essays, 1855-58

1855
...ever adorned humanity with wealth of wit and words of wisdom.* S^ Milton has prettily observed : ' He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the honourablest things.' In few cases, we firmly believe, has the truth of this principle met with a fitter...
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The Anniversaries: Poems in Commemoration of Great Men and Great Events

Thomas Hornblower Gill, Thomas Howard Gill - 1858 - 193 pages
...• Nor stain the sword, nor drop the shield that MILTON. 9. On this day, 1608, Milton was born. " He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem."—MILTON, Apology for Smectymntws. 0! NOT to-day, mine England, with proud eye Thy retinue of...
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The Pioneer Preacher, Or, Rifle, Axe, and Saddle-bags, and Other Lectures

William Henry Milburn - 1858 - 309 pages
...pure thoughts without transgression. And long it was not after, when I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter, in things laudable, ought himself to T)ea true poem; that is a composition and pattern of the best and...
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