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" I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem... "
Essays and Poems - Page 34
by Jones Very - 1839 - 175 pages
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Barbarous Dissonance and Images of Voice in Milton's Epics

Elizabeth Sauer, Professor of English Elizabeth Sauer - 1996 - 213 pages
...practices. In An Apology against a Pamphlet Milton describes the exemplary author in terms of a poem: "he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought him selfe to bee a true Poem, that is, a composition, and patterne of the best and honourablest things"...
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Humanism

Tony Davies, Grahame Davies - 1997 - 152 pages
...master spirit' (Milton 1990: 578), he only reciprocates what he had written a couple of years before, that 'he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himselfe to bee a true Poem, that is a composition, and patterne of the best and honourablest things'.7...
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Harlan Hubbard: Life and Work

Wendell Berry - 1997 - 144 pages
...Harlan as unmodern. It aligns him with an older artistic tradition exemplified by John Milton, who wrote that "he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things ought him selfe to bee a true Poem, that is, a composition, and patterne of the best and honorablest things."17...
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The Wordsworth Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - 1998 - 669 pages
...try to prevent it and to damn the consequences. MILTON John 1608-1674 7454 An Apology for Smectymnuus n of authority. 4927 The great end of life is not...actlon. 4928 If some great power would agree to make 7455 An Apology for Smectymnuus His words ... like so many nimble and airy servitors trip about him...
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The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

Oxford University Press, TME. - 1999 - 1136 pages
...hath her victories No less renowned than war. 'To the Ix>rd (¡eneral Cromwell' (written 1652! 5 I le who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well...laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem. Ли Apology far Smectwnnuus (1642) introduction 6 For this is not the liberty which we can hope, that...
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Menacing Virgins: Representing Virginity in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Nancy Weitz - 1999 - 246 pages
...Having studied the virtuously inspiring Petrarch and Dante, he reports: I was confirm'd in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought him selfe to bee a true Poem, that is, a composition, and patterne of the best and honourablest things...
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The Cambridge Companion to Milton

Dennis Danielson - 1999 - 297 pages
...Confutation (April 1641), again emphasizing his virtue and learning. Here he offers his famous prescription that 'he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought him selfe to bee a true Poem' (YP i: 890). Whether Milton actually lived up to this high standard,...
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Milton, Authorship, and the Book Trade

Stephen B. Dobranski - 1999 - 245 pages
...as inconsistent for changing his mind about pre-publication licensing. When in 1642 Milton claimed that "he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought him selfe to bee a true Poem, that is, a composition, and patterne of the best and honourablest things"...
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Felicia Hemans: Selected Poems, Letters, Reception Materials

Mrs. Hemans, Felicia Dorothea Browne Hemans, Susan J Wolfson - 2000 - 633 pages
...["Introductory Remarks"] It was our divine Milton, who, wisely as forcibly, laid down the principle "that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...himself to be a true poem, that is, a composition of the best and honourablest things."7 Often as this golden wisdom has been neglected by our poets...
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Margaret Fuller, Critic: Writings from the New-York Tribune, 1844-1846

Margaret Fuller - 2000 - 491 pages
...that the slightest touch of his speat exposed deceit. Sweetymmius.' [ Smectymmius.' "He who would nor be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in...himself to be a true poem; that is, a composition and partern of the best and honorablest things; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous...
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