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" I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem... "
Essays and Poems - Page 34
by Jones Very - 1839 - 175 pages
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Specimens of English Prose Writers: From the Earliest Times to the Close of ...

George Burnett - 1813
...pure thoughts, without transgression. And long it was not after, when I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to .write well hereafter in laudahle•things, ought himself to bfr a. true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of .the best...
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The British Plutarch: Containing the Lives of the Most Eminent ..., Volume 3

Francis Wrangham - 1816
...pure thoughts without transgression. And long it was not after, when I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless he...
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The Life of John Milton

Charles Symmons - 1822 - 490 pages
...hand, the guileless heart; 36 i was confirmed in the opinion that he, who would not be frustrated of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things,...best and honorablest things, not presuming to sing the high praises of heroic men or famous cities, unless he has in himself the experience and the practice...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton: With Notes of Various Authors ..., Volume 2

John Milton - 1824
...Art. Poet. 102. i Milton with great depth of ' judgment observes in his ' Apology for Smectymnnus, that ' he who would not be frustrate ' of his hope to write well in ' laudable things, ought himself ' to be a true poem, that is, a ' tompotition of the liest and...
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Examples of English Prose: From the Reign of Elizabeth to the Present Time ...

George Walker - 1825 - 615 pages
...pure thoughts, without transgression. And long it was not after, when I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and most honourable tilings ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless...
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A Selection from the English Prose Works of John Milton, Volume 1

John Milton - 1826
...pure thoughts without transgression. And long it was not after, when I was confirmed in this opinion ; that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...best and honorablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men or famous cities, unless he have in himself the experience and the practice...
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The Christian Examiner, Volume 3

1826
...of poetry. ' I was confirmed,' he says, in his usual noble style, ' I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things ; not presuming to sing of high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless...
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A Selection from the English Prose Works of John Milton, Volume 1

John Milton - 1826
...after, when I was confirmed in this opinion ; that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to writ* well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to...best and honorablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men or famous cities, unless he have in himself the experience and the practice...
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American Tracts

1827
...of poetry. ' I was confirmed,' he says, in his usual noble style, * I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things ; not presuming to sing of high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless...
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The North American Review, Volume 25

1827
...the man till then ; never felt how entirely and supremely he was a poet, or, to use his own words, ' a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honorablest things.' We never knew till then, what a noble, highminded being, what a contemner of littleness and baseness,...
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