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" I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem... "
Essays and Poems - Page 34
by Jones Very - 1839 - 175 pages
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LITERATURE AND ART

S. MARGARET FULLER - 1852
...daily paper. Beside, who can think of Milton without the feeling which he himself expresses ? — " He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...best and honorablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless he have in himself the experience and the practice...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton, Volume 1

John Milton - 1852
...this opinion, that he who would not frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter, in things laudable, ought himself to be a true poem; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless he...
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The North British review

1852
...lecturer, as sure as fate, a rebuke, though from young lips, that would have made his old face blush. " He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in landable things, ought himself to be a true poem :" — fancy that sentence — an early and often...
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Notes, theological, political, and miscellaneous, ed. by D. Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1853
...good man. Dedication to the Fox.* Ben Jonson has borrowed this just and noble sentiment from Strabo. * "He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...that is a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things — not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men or famous cities, unless he...
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Notes, Theological, Political, and Miscellaneous

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1853 - 415 pages
...good man. Dedication to the Fox.* Ben Jonson has borrowed this just and noble sentiment from Strabo. * "He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter iu laudable things ought himself to be a true poem — that is a composition and pattern of the best...
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Lives of the illustrious. The Biographical magazine [ed. by J.P. Edwards].

Biographical magazine - 1853
...us hear what our great poet has to say on this point. "He, who would aspire to write well hereafter, ought himself to be a true poem — that is, a composition and a pattern of the best and honourablest things — not presuming to sing high praises of high men and...
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An Account of the Life, Opinions, and Writings of John Milton: With an ...

Thomas Keightley - 1855 - 484 pages
...pure thoughts, without transgression. And long it was not after when 1 was confirmed in this opinion, that he, who would not be frustrate of his hope to...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and houourablest things, — not presuming to sing * '. e. most inclined to love, and to light and amorous...
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Cambridge Essays, Volume 1

1855
...that ever adorned humanity with wealth of wit and words of wisdom.* Milton has prettily observed : ' He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the honourablest things.' In few cases, we firmly believe, has the truth of this principle met with a fitter...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton

John Milton - 1855 - 748 pages
...Primum ipsi tibi. Milton with great depth of judgment observes, in his " Apology for Smectymnuus," that, " he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem, that is, a composition of the best and honourablest...
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Essays Biographical and Critical: Chiefly on English Poets

David Masson - 1856 - 475 pages
...pure thoughts, without transgression. And long it was not after when I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men or famous cities, unless he...
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