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" I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem... "
Essays and Poems - Page 34
by Jones Very - 1839 - 175 pages
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Papers on Literature and Art, Parts 1-2

Margaret Fuller - 1846
...daily paper. Beside, who can think of Milton without the feeling which he himself expresses ? — " He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...best and honorablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless he have in himself the experience and the practice...
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Papers on literature and art, Part 1

Sarah Margaret Ossoli (march.) - 1846
...daily paper. Beside, who can think of Milton without the feeling which he himself expresses ? — " He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write...best and honorablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless he have in himself the experience and the practice...
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The Prospective Review: A Quarterly Journal of Theology and Literature, Volume 3

1847
...all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.' He declared that ' he who would aspire to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought...true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the heart and honorablest things, not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless...
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The Prose Works of John Milton, Volume 3

John Milton - 1848
...the details of agriculture, for something to suit his purpose. — ED. * Dante and Petrarch. opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...that is, a composition and pattern of the Best and honourablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless he...
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 18

1849
...life-struggle against vice, and error, and darknesss, in all its forms. He had started with the conviction "that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honorableest things ;" and from this he never swerved. His life was indeed a true poem ; or it might...
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The Juvenile companion, and Sunday-school hive [afterw.] The ..., Volumes 5-6

1856
...a true poet. His noble words on this subject are as follows : — " He that would not be frustrated of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things,...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless he...
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Lectures on Dramatic Literature: Or, The Employment of the Passions in Drama

Saint-Marc Girardin - 1849 - 245 pages
...enchantments of the man who had slept. * "And long it was not after, when I was confirmed in this opinion that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best...
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Milton's Paradise Lost: With Copius Notes, Explanatory and Critical, Partly ...

John Milton, James Prendeville - 1850 - 382 pages
...guide." The following extracts are only portions of his own defence. " I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to...write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and most honourable things; not presuming...
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The Guardian, Volumes 32-33

1881
...confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not bo frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter ia laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem, that is a composition and pattern of the best and houorablest things, not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men or famous cities, unless he have...
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The Monthly Christian spectator, Volume 1

1851
...heroic, we can never appreciate his poetry. We must understand (as he himself has finely expressed it) that ' He who would not be frustrate of his hope to...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things ; not presuming to sing of high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless...
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