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" Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor ? Ha ! have you eyes ? You cannot call it love, for at your age The hey-day in the blood is tame, it's humble, And waits upon the judgment ; and what judgment Would step from this... "
The works of Shakespear [ed. by H. Blair], in which the beauties observed by ... - Page 145
by William Shakespeare - 1771
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The Klingon Hamlet

Lawrence Schoen - 2001 - 240 pages
...husband. — Look you now, what follows: Here is your husband, like a mildew'd ear, Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain...for at your age The hey-day in the blood is tame, it's humble, And waits upon the judgment: and what judgment Would step from this to this? Sense, sure,...
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Hamlet: The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke : the First Folio of 1623 ...

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 261 pages
...husband. Look you now what follows. Here is your husband, like a mildew'd ear Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain...love; for at your age The heyday in the blood is tame, it's humble, The Tragedie of Hamlet 145 If damned Custome haue not braz'd it so, That it is proofe...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: A Thematic Guide

Victor L. Cahn - 2001 - 361 pages
...rails at length about her behavior. Showing her pictures of Claudius and old Hamlet, Hamlet cries out: Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain leave...love, for at your age The heyday in the blood is tame, it's humble, And waits upon the judgment, and what judgment Would step from this to this? (Ill, iv,...
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Deadly Thought: Hamlet and the Human Soul

Jan H. Blits - 2001 - 405 pages
...intervention. Having described the brothers' looks, Hamlet proceeds to discuss Gertrude's ability to see: Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain leave...to feed And batten on this moor? Ha, have you eyes? (3.4.65-67) Although she was able to see the difference, Gertrude acted as though she were blind. She...
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The Tragedie of Coriolanus

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...(Dict., sv 1) : To grow fat; to fatten (Scand.). Shakespeare has batten (Intrans.), Hamlet, III, iv, 67, ['Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed And batten on this moor']; but Milton has 'battening our flocks,' Lycidas, l. 29. Strictly, it is Intransitive. Icelandic: batna,...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 148 pages
...husband. Look you now what follows. Here is your husband, like a mildewed ear Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, 67 And batten on this moor? Ha! have you eyes? You cannot call it love, for at your age 69 The heyday...
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Amleto

William Shakespeare - 1995 - 320 pages
...husband. Look you now what follows. Here is your husband ; like a mildewed ear, Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain...feed, And batten on this moor? Ha! Have you eyes? You cannut call it love. For at your age The heyday in the blood is rame; it's humble, Un atto tale che...
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Shakespearean Language: A Guide for Actors and Students

Leslie O'Dell - 2002 - 269 pages
...designed to arouse intense reactions in listeners: Epiplexis: asking questions to chide or reprehend. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair Mountain leave...feed, And batten on this Moor? ha? Have you eyes? [Hamlet 3 .4.65] Other manipulations are more subtle, and structural in nature: Epanorthosis: statement...
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Menopause: Bridging the Gap Between Natural and Conventional Medicine

Lorilee Schoenbeck - 2002 - 352 pages
...she could, at her age, experience new passion; rather she is supposed to just wait for her own death: "You cannot call it love, for at your age, the heyday in the blood is tame, it's humble, and waits upon the judgment."27 The notion of the defeminized, dispassionate, and depressed...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 34

Stanley Wells - 2002 - 224 pages
...remember Hamlet's double-edged words to Gertrude, when he shows her the portraits of her two husbands: Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor? (3.4.66-7) In fact, throughout the first scene of Othello, the Moor is presented in the traditional...
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