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" Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor ? Ha ! have you eyes ? You cannot call it love, for at your age The hey-day in the blood is tame, it's humble, And waits upon the judgment ; and what judgment Would step from this... "
The works of Shakespear [ed. by H. Blair], in which the beauties observed by ... - Page 145
by William Shakespeare - 1771
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A Glossary and Etymological Dictionary of Obsolete and Uncommon Words ...

William Toone - 1832 - 467 pages
...the kissing of her batlet, As You LIEE IT. BATTEN, to fatten, to get flesh, to fertilize. Could yon on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor? HAMLET. We drove afield, Battening oar flocks with the fresh dews of night. MILTON'S LYCIDAS. BAUBLE...
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A Glossary and Etymological Dictionary: Of Obsolete and Uncommon Words ...

William Toone - 1834 - 467 pages
...remember the kissing of her but let. As You LIKE IT. BATTEN, to fatten, to get flesh, to fertilize. Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor ? HAMLET. We drove afield, Battening our flocks with the fresh dews of night. MILTON'S LytinAS. BAUBLE...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - 1992 - 138 pages
...husband. Look you now what follows. Here is your husband, like a mildewed ear, Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain...love, for at your age The heyday in the blood is tame, it's humble, And waits upon the judgement; and what judgement Would step from this to this? Sense sure...
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Speech for the Stage

Evangeline Machlin - 1992 - 254 pages
...husband./ Look you now what follows: Here is your husband, like a mildew 'd ear, Blasting his wholesome brother. /Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor?/Ha! have you eyes?/ You cannot call it love, for at your age The hey-day in the blood is tame,...
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The Masks of Hamlet

Marvin Rosenberg - 1992 - 971 pages
...the animal-feed imagery, echoing his first soliloquy's complaint of Gertrude's voracious appetite: Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed And batten on this moor? He has dared to hold her chin to make her look. The son handling the mother. A thick sensuality may...
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Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare's Plays ...

Janet Adelman - 1992 - 379 pages
...like the same activity: the imagery of devouring common to both tends to flatten out the distinction. "Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed / And batten on this moor?" Hamlet asks his mother (3.4.66-67), insisting again on a difference that seems largely without substance,...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 45

Stanley Wells - 2002 - 224 pages
...simply rhetorical; the other disputant in this moral debate may just possibly have a counter-argument. 'You cannot call it love, for at your age / The heyday in the blood is tame, it's humble' (lines 68-9) is aggressive, yet meant to persuade; surely, he seems to insist, you accept...
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And Flights of Angels

Terrence Ortwein - 1994 - 91 pages
...husband. Look you now what follows. Here is your husband, like a mildewed ear Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor? You cannot call it love, for at your age The heydey in the blood is tame, it's humble, And waits upon...
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Everybody's Shakespeare: Reflections Chiefly on the Tragedies

Maynard Mack - 1993 - 279 pages
...pale cast of thought" (3. i. 83). There are also more immediate riddles. His mother — how could she "on this fair mountain leave to feed, And batten on this moor" (3.4.67)? The ghost — which may be a devil, for "the devil hath power T' assume a pleasing shape"...
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Selected Poems

William Shakespeare - 1995 - 128 pages
...husband. Look you now what follows. Here is your husband, like a mildewed ear Blasting his wholesome brother. Have you eyes? Could you on this fair mountain...love, for at your age The heyday in the blood is tame, it's humble, And waits upon the judgment, and what judgment Would step from this to this? Sense sure...
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