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" Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, And thou no breath at all ? Thou 'It come no more, Never, never, never, never, never ! Pray you, undo this button : thank you, sir. "
The British Essayists: With Prefaces Biographical, Historical and Critical - Page 180
by Lionel Thomas Berguer - 1823
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Kant and the Ethics of Humility: A Story of Dependence, Corruption and Virtue

Jeanine Grenberg - 2005 - 269 pages
...die, and the injustice of their world will thereby be revealed. As Lear laments over Cordelia's death, "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, / And thou no breath at all?" (v.3. 306-307). Shakespeare is clearly pessimistic about whether there is genuine room in this world...
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La bioéthique dans la perspective de la philosophie du droit

Francesco D'Agostino - 2005 - 137 pages
...morte, le roi Lear ne pleure pas la mort d'un être vivant mais cette mort, la mort de sa fille : « Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, and thou no breath at ail ? » C'est uniquement parce qu'il peut recevoir (de la psyché) une identité et un sens que le...
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The Yale Book of Quotations

Fred R. Shapiro, Associate Librarian and Lecturer in Legal Research Fred R Shapiro - 2006 - 1067 pages
...woman. King Lear act 5, sc. 3, 1. 270 (1605-1606) 318 And my poor fool is hanged. No, no, no life! ob Hope (Leslie Townes Hope) English-born US comedian, 1903-2003 1 A O thou'lt come no more Never, never, never, never, never. King Lear act 5, sc. 3, 1. 304 (1605-1606)...
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German Shakespeare Studies at the Turn of the Twenty-first Century

Christa Jansohn - 2006 - 318 pages
...animal. Lear speaks the last words on this topic to the dead Cordelia, seconds before his own death: Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life And thou no breath at all? (5.3.305-6) This is not closure, not a clean exit, much less consolation. The seemingly random list...
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The Cambridge Introduction to Early English Theatre

Janette Dillon - 2006 - 296 pages
...'this great decay' (V. 3 .2 7 1 ); for Lear, Cordelia's death makes no sense in the scheme of things ('Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, / And thou no breath at all' (V.3. 280-1)); Lear's own death as he struggles to revive her merely ratchets up the suffering for...
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Word Wizard: Super Bloopers, Rich Reflections, and Other Acts of Word Magic

Richard Lederer - 2007 - 272 pages
...than William Shakespeare, whose dying King Lear laments: And my poor fool is hang'd! No, no, no life! Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, And thou no breath at all? . . . Do you see this? Look on her! Look! Her lips! Look there, look there! Shakespeare's contemporaries...
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Old Age Is a Terminal Illness

Alma Bond - 2006 - 188 pages
...understand choosing to sleep under the sod. As King Lear said to his dead daughter, I ask you, Kendall, "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, /And thou no breath at all 112 ?" Then Ed Griffin, an ex-priest and dear writer friend told me of someone who found an answer...
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Infirm Glory: Shakespeare and the Renaissance Image of Man

Sukanta Chaudhuri - 1981 - 231 pages
...disintegration after it. His last speech still reflects the starkest question in human experience: Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, And thou no breath at all? (V. iii. 306-7) By the time Lear dies, he has stretched every moral fibre to the uttermost. His very...
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Devil Theatre: Demonic Possession and Exorcism in English Renaissance Drama ...

Jan Frans van Dijkhuizen - 2007 - 220 pages
...then she lives' (5 .3.260-2). Cordelia's death is represented as the absence of such bodily signs: 'Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, / And thou no breath at all?' (5.3.305-6). Lear's list of animals, as a shorthand for unaccomodated physicality, recalls Lear's earlier...
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The Night is Far Spent: A Treasury of Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard, Vivian W. Dudro - 2007 - 355 pages
...and beauty and dignity that we call humanness should be snuffed out while mere beasts go on living. "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, /And thou no breath at all?" (IV, iii, 307), he asks, addressing the dead body of his beloved daughter Cordelia, which he carries...
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