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" Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, And thou no breath at all ? Thou 'It come no more, Never, never, never, never, never ! Pray you, undo this button : thank you, sir. "
The British Essayists: With Prefaces Biographical, Historical and Critical - Page 180
by Lionel Thomas Berguer - 1823
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The Shakespeare reader: with notes, historical and grammatical by ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1871
...your rights; 390 Look there! look there! [Dies. Lear. And my poor fool is hanged! No, no; no life! Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, And thou no breath at all 1 Thou 'It come no more, Never, never, never, never, never !—• Pray you, undo this button: thank...
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Shakespeare: The Two Traditions

Herbert R. Coursen - 1999 - 271 pages
...make sense of what otherwise makes no sense at all, or to articulate questions that have no answers: "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, / And thou no breath at all?" Anthony Davies says of theatrical experience that "Our willing suspension of disbelief has no threshold...
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King Lear: The 1608 Quarto and 1623 Folio Texts

William Shakespeare - 2000 - 270 pages
...all foes The cup of their deservings. O see, see! LEAR And my poor fool is hanged. No, no life? 304 Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, And thou no breath at all? O, thou wilt come no more. Never, never, never. - Pray you, undo This button. Thank you, sir. O, O,...
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The Oxford Shakespeare: The History of King Lear

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 336 pages
...Leech and JMR Margeson (Toronto, 1972), pp. 215-29. over Cordelia's body of the unanswerable question 'Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, | And thou no breath at all?' (24.301-2). To its early audiences, the language of King Lear must have seemed very strange, as original...
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Making Theatre: From Text to Performance

Peter Mudford - 2000 - 236 pages
...confusion: 'We are waiting for Godot to come' Lear, unlike Vladimir, is denied even that ironic humour: Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, And thou no breath at all? As Peter Hall has said, the greatest art is characterized by clarity and simplicity; and these qualities...
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Shakespeare's Reading

Robert S. Miola, Gerard Manley Hopkins Professor of English Robert S Miola, James S. MacKillop, Robert S.. Miola - 2000 - 186 pages
...252 sd). The grief-stricken father helplessly cradles his beloved daughter, 'dead as earth' (257): 'Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, | And thou no breath at all. O thou wilt come no more. | Never, never, never' (301-3). The agony of Lear's grief and the gratuitousness...
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Whither the Postmodern Library?: Libraries, Technology, and Education in the ...

William H. Wisner - 2000 - 133 pages
...slave that was a-hanging thee. I'll see that straight. And my poor fool is hanged: no, no, no life? Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life, And thou no breath at all? Thou'llt come no more. Pray you undo this button. Thank you sir. It was a moment, quite outside of...
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Historicism, Psychoanalysis, and Early Modern Culture

Carla Mazzio - 2000 - 417 pages
...that her breath will mist or stain the stone, / Why then she lives"; "This feather stirs, she lives!" "Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, / And thou no breath at all?": 5.3.262-64, 266, 3o7-8); Othello's on Desdemona's breath, before and after suffocating her ("O balmy...
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Henry V, War Criminal?: And Other Shakespeare Puzzles

John Sutherland, Karl-Heinz Engel, Lord Northcliffe Professor of Modern English Literature John Sutherland, Cedric Thomas Watts, John M. Sutherland, Emeritus Professor of English Cedric Watts, M a PH D - 2000 - 220 pages
...here as a term of endearment), cries out in his misery: And my poor fool is hang'd! No, no, no life! Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, And thou no breath at all?2 (5.3.304-6) It's a question which commentators often try to answer. Samuel Johnson, of course,...
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Religion and Cultural Studies

Susan L. Mizruchi - 2001 - 269 pages
...passing or the passing of a loved one. We may ask, like King Lear with the dead Cordelia in his arms, Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life And thou no breath at all? Yet we may be consoled that, though we pass away, the sun rises, and the sun sets, and the earth abides...
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