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" I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue unexercised, and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race, where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat. Assuredly we bring not innocence... "
Areopagitica: A Speech to the Parliament of England, for the Liberty of ... - Page 65
by John Milton - 1819 - 311 pages
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A Companion to Milton

Thomas N. Corns - 2003 - 548 pages
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Books and Readers in Early Modern England: Material Studies

Jennifer Andersen, Elizabeth Sauer - 2002 - 305 pages
...wrongdoing. Milton instead continued to defend his position with indignation based on his personal beliefs: "that which purifies us is triall, and triall is by what is contrary" (CPW2:$1$). This is where Milton was a radical: in the ideas about reading and licensing which he had...
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How Milton Works

Stanley Eugene Fish, Professor of English and Professor of Law Stanley Fish - 2001 - 616 pages
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The Uncertain World of Samson Agonistes

John T. Shawcross - 2001 - 158 pages
...poem. As in Areopagitica where Milton accepts the nonexistence of innocence for humankind ("Assuredly we bring not innocence into the world, we bring impurity much rather," 12) and where recovery is prepared for by trial ("that which purifies us is triall, and triall is by...
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The Endless Kingdom: Milton's Scriptural Society

David Gay - 2002 - 220 pages
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Principles of Publicity and Press Freedom

Slavko Splichal - 2002 - 229 pages
...and continually tested in trials, where contrary experiences and opinions are confronted. "Assuredly we bring not innocence into the world, we bring impurity much rather; that which purifies us is trial, and trial is by what is contrary." Books are most appropriate means "to the trial of virtue...
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British Writers: Retrospective supplement, Volume 2

Jay Parini - 2002 - 509 pages
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Shakespeare Among the Animals: Nature and Society in the Drama of Early ...

Bruce Boehrer - 2002 - 212 pages
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The Earthly Paradise: The Garden of Eden from Antiquity to Modernity

F. Regina Psaki, Charles Hindley - 2001 - 388 pages
...unassayeoV Alone, without exterior help sustained?" (DC, 335—336) In Areopagitica Milton says that "we bring not innocence into the world, we bring impurity much rather." But "which purifies us is triall, and triall is by what is contrary." "Blank vertue" is not a pure...
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Pamphlets and Pamphleteering in Early Modern Britain

Joad Raymond - 2006 - 403 pages
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