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" The slaves are ours. So do I answer you : The pound of flesh, which I demand of him, Is dearly bought, 'tis mine, and I will have it : If you deny me, fie upon your law ! There is no force in the decrees of Venice. I stand for judgment : answer ; shall... "
Much ado about nothing. The merchant of Venice. Love's labour's lost. As you ... - Page 147
by William Shakespeare - 1762
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The Annotated Shakespeare: The comedies

William Shakespeare - 1978 - 3 pages
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Comedy High and Low: An Introduction to the Experience of Comedy

Maurice Charney - 1978 - 203 pages
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Renaissance Drama

Leonard Barkan - 1979 - 216 pages
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Comic Transformations in Shakespeare

Ruth Nevo - 1980 - 242 pages
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New Approaches to Ruskin: Thirteen Essays

Robert Hewison - 1981 - 229 pages
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New Approaches to Ruskin: Thirteen Essays

Robert Hewison - 1981 - 229 pages
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Shakespearean Criticism: Excerpts from the Criticism of William ..., Volume 25

1984
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Shakespeare's Universe of Discourse: Language-Games in the Comedies

Keir Elam - 1984 - 349 pages
...be free . . . you will answer 'The slaves are ours' - so do I answer you: The pound of flesh which / demand of him Is dearly bought, 'tis mine and I will have it: If you deny me, fie upon your law! There is no force in the decrees of Venice: I stand for judgment, - answer, shall I have it? (4. 1....
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 37

Stanley Wells - 2002 - 240 pages
...own interests, each asserting the primacy of his or her bond. Shylock declares: The pound of flesh which I demand of him Is dearly bought, 'tis mine and I will have it. (4.1.99-100) His words echo Portia's description of Bassanio as ' dear bought' (3.2.3 12). Like Shylock,...
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