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" His spear, to equal which the tallest pine Hewn on Norwegian hills, to be the mast Of some great admiral, were but a wand... "
Letters to Lord Byron on a Question of Poetical Criticism: With Corrections ... - Page 10
by William Lisle Bowles - 1822 - 217 pages
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Paradise lost, a poem

John Milton - 1831
...the top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, in her spotty glohe. His spear, to equal which the tallest pine Hewn on Norwegian hills, to he the mast Of some great ammiral, were hut a wand, He walk'd with, to support uneasy steps Over the...
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Historical View of the Progress of Discovery on the More Northern Coasts of ...

Patrick Fraser Tytler, James Wilson - 1833 - 444 pages
...upwards of 250 feet, varying from 20 to nearly 60 feet in circumference ; — thus far exceeding The tallest pine Hewn on Norwegian hills to be the mast Of some great ammiral." The stem is remarkably straight, and is destitute of branches for about two-thirds of its height. The1...
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The Olio, Or, Museum of Entertainment, Volume 10

1833
...the first of these which follow, he copied Cowley, and in the second he remembered Shakspeare : — His spear, to equal which the tallest pine Hewn on Norwegian hills, to be the mast Of some great admiral, were but a wand. Milten. PL His spear the trunk was of a lofty tree. Which nature meant some...
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A Grammar of Elocution

Rev. Samuel Wood - 1833
...the country I must fetch my allusions from thence) that only male birds have voices. — Spectator. His spear (to equal which the tallest pine, Hewn on Norwegian hills to be the mast / Of some great admiral, were but a wand) He walked with, to support uneasy steps Over the burning marie. — Milton....
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The Poetical Works of John Milton

John Milton - 1834 - 392 pages
...top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, 290 Rivers , or mountains , in her spotty globe. His spear, to equal which the tallest pine Hewn on...Norwegian hills , to be the mast Of some great ammiral , we:-e but a wand, He walk'd with , to support uneasy steps 295 Over the burning marie, not like those...
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Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets,: With Critical Observations on ...

Samuel Johnson - 1835
...the trunk was of a lofty tree, Which nature meant some tall ship's mast should be. Milton of Satan : His spear, to equal which the tallest pine Hewn on Norwegian hills, to be thg mast Of some great ammiral, were but a wand, He walked with. torn has given them. Language is the...
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The first four books of Milton's Paradise lost, with notes, by J.R. Major

John Milton - 1835
...the top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, on her spotty glohe. His spear (to equal which the tallest pine Hewn on Norwegian hills to he the mast Of some great ammiral, were hut a wand) He wnlk'd with, to support uneasy steps Over the...
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The Spectator: With Notes and a General Index, Volumes 1-2

1836
...Fetole, Or in Valdarnn, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, on her spotty globe. His spear fto equal which the tallest pine Hewn on Norwegian hills to be the mast Of some great admiral, were but a wand) He walk'd with, to support uneaiy stepa Over the bnraiag marl! To which we...
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Lectures on English Poetry: To the Time of Milton

Stanhope Busby - 1837 - 118 pages
...from the top of Fesole, Or in Valdamo, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, in her spotty globe. His spear, to equal which the tallest pine, Hewn on Norwegian hills to be the mast Of some great admiral, were but a wand, He walk' d with to support uneasy steps Over the burning marie, not like...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: Lives of the poets

Samuel Johnson - 1837
...the trunk was of a lofty tree, Which Nature meant some tall ship's mast should be-. Milton of Satan : is friend's indignation, that he was forced to appease him by a promise of forbearing Sir sreat admiral, were but a wand, He walked with. His diction was in his own time censured as negligent....
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