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" Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion, and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas,... "
Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, to the Works of the English Poets ... - Page 134
by Samuel Johnson - 1779
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Common Courtesy in Eighteenth-century English Literature

William Bowman Piper - 1997 - 200 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell." Notice how, even in formulating these general opinions, Johnson shares with society the details on...
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The Cambridge Companion to Milton

Dennis Danielson - 1999 - 297 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; and he who thus praises will confer no honour' (quoted in Patrides, 60-1). What Johnson is...
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Genre and Ethics: The Education of an Eighteenth-century Critic

Edward Tomarken - 2002 - 284 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honor. (1:2739) By 1779, when Johnson published this assessment...
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The Threshold of English Prose

Henry Arthur Treble - 1930 - 240 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honour. This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these...
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Geschichte der Literaturkritik: Das späte 18. Jahrhundert, das Zeitalter der ...

René Wellek - 1978 - 754 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honor.« 20. ebenda, } (Lyttelton), 456: »It is sufficient...
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The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: With Critical Observations on ...

Samuel Johnson - 1821
...without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lyeidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ;v, he who thus praises will confer no honour. . %! ni..Vi ioY^»n This poem has, yet a grosser...
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