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" Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion, and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas,... "
Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, to the Works of the English Poets ... - Page 134
by Samuel Johnson - 1779
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - 1911 - 724 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honor. This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these trifling...
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A Book of English Literature, Selected and Ed, Volume 1

Franklyn Bliss Snyder, Robert Grant Martin - 1916 - 889 pages
...flocks alone, without any judge [80 of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honor. This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these trifling...
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Doctor Johnson: A Study in Eighteenth Century Humanism

Percy Hazen Houston - 1923 - 280 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell.1 Such an account will neither excite sympathy nor confer honour." 2 Johnson, in consequence of...
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A History of Modern Criticism 1750-1950: Volume 1, The Later Eighteenth Century

René Wellek - 1981 - 368 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honor." " Two Ramblers (Nos. 42 and 46) are devoted to...
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Variorum Commentary on the Poems of John Milton: The Minor English Poems, Part 2

A. S. P. Woodhouse, Douglas Bush - 1970
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honour. Lycidas 'This poem has yet a grosser fault. With...
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The Cornhill Magazine

George Smith, William Makepeace Thackeray - 1874
...has lost his companion, and must now feed his flocks alone ; how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves can excite no sympathy, he who thus praises will confer no honour." Of course every tyro in criticism...
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A Milton Encyclopedia, Volume 5

William Bridges Hunter - 1978 - 215 pages
..."Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell . . . how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell" (in Thorpe, p. 67). Yet until the structure of the poem has been better understood in recent times,...
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Samuel Johnson: Literature, Religion and English Cultural Politics from the ...

J. C. D. Clark, Jonathan Charles Douglas Clark - 1994 - 270 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can telL He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honour.65 Edmund Waller fell into a similar error: He...
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Death in Milton's Poetry

Clay Daniel - 1994 - 183 pages
...impression created by Milton's modification is apparent in Dr. Johnson's summary of "how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell."16 As Johnson perceived, in Lycidas none of the classical gods mourns as they do in classical...
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John Milton: 1732-1801

John T. Shawcross - 1995 - 452 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, $ without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who "*' " 293 thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honour. This poem...
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