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" Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion, and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas,... "
Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, to the Works of the English Poets ... - Page 134
by Samuel Johnson - 1779
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Johnson's Life of Milton, with intr. and notes by F. Ryland

Samuel Johnson - 1894
...without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, 30 and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour. such as ought never to be polluted with such...
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Studies of a Biographer, Volume 4

Sir Leslie Stephen - 1902
...flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour.' Perhaps a young reader would really learn more...
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Lives of Milton and Addison

Samuel Johnson, John Wight Duff - 1900 - 209 pages
...must now feed 2 5 his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour. ^o trifling fictions are mingled the most awful...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 194

1901
...flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour.' Perhaps a young reader would really learn more...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 194

1901
...flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour.' Perhaps a young reader would really learn more...
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Milton's Lycidas

John Milton - 1902 - 112 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honour. " This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these...
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Lives of the English Poets: Cowley-Dryden

Samuel Johnson - 1905
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how ^ne god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour 2. i How oft unweary'd have we spent the nights,...
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AN ENGLISH PROSE MISCELLANY

JOHN MASEFIELD - 1907
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour. This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these...
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Milton

Samuel Johnson - 1907 - 144 pages
...now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another 20 god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour. This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these...
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Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Macdonald Alden - 1911 - 724 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honor. This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these trifling...
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