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" Nothing can less display knowledge, or less exercise invention, than to tell how a shepherd has lost his companion, and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas,... "
Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, to the Works of the English Poets ... - Page 134
by Samuel Johnson - 1779
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The Poetical Works of John Milton

John Milton - 1855 - 748 pages
...flocks alone, ' without any judge of his skill in piping ! and how ouo god asks another what, is becuoie of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He, who thus grieves, will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises, will confer no honour. This poem has yet a grosser fault. With those...
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The Lives of the English Poets: cowley. Denham. Milton. Butler. Rochester ...

Samuel Johnson - 1858
...his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy; he who thus praises will confer no honour. Such is the power of reputation justly acquired,...
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Evenings in Arcadia

John Dennis - 1865 - 321 pages
...flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour. This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these...
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Milton's Samson agonistes and Lycidas, with notes etc., by J. Hunter

John Milton - 1870
...now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves, will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises, will confer no honour. ' This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these...
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The Living Age, Volume 121

1874
...has lost his compan-. ion, and must now feed his flocks alone ; how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves can excite no sympathy, he who thus praises will confer no honour." Of course every tyro in criticism...
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 19; Volume 82

John Holmes Agnew, Walter Hilliard Bidwell - 1874
...shepherd has lost his companion, and must now feed his flocks alone; how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves can excite no sympathy, he who thus praises will confer no honor." Of course every tyro in criticism...
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The Cornhill Magazine, Volume 29

William Makepeace Thackeray - 1874
...has lost his companion, and must now feed his flocks alone ; how one god asks another god what has become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves can eicite no sympathy, he who thus praises will confer no honour." Of course every tyro in criticism...
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Lycidas

John Milton - 1877 - 28 pages
...and must now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy, he who thus praises will confer no honour. ' This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these...
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Our Great Writers, Or, Popular Chapters on Some Leading Authors

Samuel Andrews (M.A.) - 1884 - 275 pages
...inherent improbability always forces dissatisfaction on the mind. . . . We hear how one god asks another, what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour.' . . . and so on ; finishing up with this final...
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Milton, with an Introduction and Notes

Samuel Johnson - 1892 - 139 pages
...now feed his flocks alone, without any judge of his skill in piping ; and how one god asks another 20 god what is become of Lycidas, and how neither god can tell. He who thus grieves will excite no sympathy ; he who thus praises will confer no honour. ^ This poem has yet a grosser fault. With these...
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