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" LAWS of this government, to the great end of all government, viz: to support power in reverence with the people, and to secure the people from the abuse of power; that they may be free by their just obedience, and the magistrates honourable for their... "
The Analectic Magazine...: Comprising Original Reviews, Biography ... - Page 146
1819
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Extracts from The true grandeur of nations; an oration

Charles Sumner - 1846 - 31 pages
...rule of conduct for the intercourse of nations. While he recognized as a great end of government, ' to support power in reverence with the people, and to secure the people from abuse of power,' he declined the superfluous protection of arms against foreign force, and 'aimed to...
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The British Friend

1846
...rule of conduct for the intercourse of nations. While he recognised as a great end of government ' to support power in reverence with the people, and to secure the people from abuse of power, ' he declined the superfluous protection of arms against foreign force, and ' aimed...
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A History of the Original Settlements on the Delaware: From Its Discovery by ...

Benjamin Ferris - 1846 - 312 pages
...obedience, and the magistrates honorable for their just administration; are the great ends of government. For liberty without obedience, is confusion, and obedience without liberty, is slavery."* Time, and experience in the science of government, may have suggested to legislators some material...
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Collections of the New-York Historical Society for the Year ...

New-York Historical Society - 1821
...sublime political enterprise than that of the founder of Pennsylvania. Never was there a legislation more boldly marked with that unity of intention which is...thus liberal and temperate, his first care was to devest himself of the almost arbitrary power with which he had been intrusted, and to establish a form...
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Friends' Review: A Religious, Literary and Miscellaneous Journal, Volume 2

1849
...lesson to succeeding legislators. Here we find distinctly announced, the great object of government, " to support power in reverence with the people, and to secure the people from the abuse of power." For William Penn observes, " that government is free where the laws rule, and the people are a party...
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The American Whig Review, Volume 10

1849
...who in drawing up a frame of fundamental law for that colony, declared the end of government to be, " to support power in reverence with the people, and to secure the people from the abuse of power." It will be borne in mind, in entering upon an examination of the first Administration, that, at its...
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Memoirs of the public and private life of William Penn

Thomas Clarkson, William Edward Forster - 1849 - 370 pages
...skill contrived and composed the frame and laws of this government to the great end of goverrjment, to support power in reverence with the people, and to secure the people from the abuse of pouter, that they may lie free by their -just obedience, and the magistrates honourable for their just...
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The Yale Literary Magazine, Volume 14

1849
...government to support power in reverence with the people, and to secure the people from the abuse of power ; for liberty without obedience is confusion, and obedience without liberty is slavery." Again, he says, " I desired to show men as free and as happy as they can be," — sentiments which...
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ANNALS OF PENNSYLVANIA,

SAMUEL HAZARD - 1850
...contrived and composed the frame and laws of this government, to the great end of all government, viz. to support power in reverence with the people, and...confusion, and obedience without liberty is slavery. To carry this evenness is partly owing to the constitution, and partly to the magistracy; where either...
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Annals of Pennsylvania, from the Discovery of the Delaware

Samuel Hazard - 1850 - 664 pages
...contrived and composed the frame and laws of this government, to the great end of all government, viz. to support power in reverence with the people, and...confusion, and obedience without liberty is slavery. To carry this evenness is partly owing to the constitution, and partly to the magistracy; where either...
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