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" The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty ! make thick my blood ; Stop up... "
Chambers's Edinburgh Journal - Page 134
1844
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STUDIES IN LOTERATURE

G.W. GRIFFIN - 1870
...which the following dialogue takes place : — " Lady M. Give him fending — He brings great news . The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, all you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here ; And fill me, from...
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Schillers Sämmtliche Schriften. Historisch-kritische Ausgabe ..., Volumes 13-14

Friedrich Schiller - 1870
...frä'd)jen, ber Tniifaiiö il.nn töbtlicCen Eintritt in mein Viaii-í mir anjufünbigen fäme ro, The raven himself is hoarse, that croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan under my battlements). — 556— 58: f ommt i(jt, iljr ®et(ler aiïe, beren ©cf^aft eS ifl, tobtli^e ®ebon(en...
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Charles Kemble's Shakspere readings, a selection of the plays as ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1870
...more Than would make up his message. Lady M. Give him tending, He brings great news. [Exit Attendant^ The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, all you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here; And fill me, from...
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A dictionary of derivations: or, An introduction to etymology: on a new plan

Robert Sullivan - 1870 - 304 pages
...voice ;' a sign or token for good or ill. " The ominous raven often doth he hear." — Drayton. " • The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan J.. ,.-- Under ray battlements." — Shakspeare. '• * ONEHOUS, onereux, onereuse, F., onerosus, L....
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A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare: Macbeth. 1873

William Shakespeare - 1873
...Than would make up his message. Lady M. Give him tending; 35 He brings great news. [Exit Messenger. The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, 36. One line, Rowe....
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The Ornithology of Shakespeare: Critically Examined, Explained, and Illustrated

James Edmund Harting - 1871 - 321 pages
...more Than would make up his message. Lady M. Give him tending ; He brings great news. [Exit Attendant. The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements." On this passage Johnson remarks : "The messenger, says the servant, had hardly breath...
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Shaksperean Fly-leaves and Jottings

Henry Thomas Hall - 1871 - 272 pages
...and when she learns of his approach, revealing how murderous are her thoughts and intent, she says, "The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements." For the fulfilment of those thoughts and desires, she wishes that the "spirits that...
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Macbeth

William Shakespeare - 1871 - 110 pages
...would make up his message. Lady Macbeth. Give him tending ; He brings great news. [Exit Messenger. The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the...
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The Shakespeare reader: with notes, historical and grammatical by ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1871
...more Than would make up his message. He brings great news. [Exit Messenger. Lady M. Give him tending; The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers, You wait on nature's mischief ! Come, thick night,...
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Freeing Shakespeare's Voice: The Actor's Guide to Talking the Text

Kristin Linklater - 1992 - 214 pages
...Lady Macbeth's comment upon the messenger who brings her the news of Duncan's arrival at her castle: The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. It seems obvious that the messenger has been running or riding in haste and is exhausted...
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