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" The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty ! make thick my blood ; Stop up... "
Chambers's Edinburgh Journal - Page 134
1844
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The works of William Shakespeare, the text formed from an entirely ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1843
...more Than would make up his message. Lady M. Give him tending: He brings great news. [Exit Attendant.] The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements8. Come, you spirits The raven himself is hoarse, That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex...
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The fortunes of Roger de Flor: or, The Almugavars

Roger de Flor (fict.name.) - 1845
...stunned by the noise of the falling waters in which he is fated to perish. 77 CHAPTER V. THE TEMPTER. " LADY MACBETH. The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements.— * * I would, while it was smiling in my face, Have plucked the nipple from...
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New Illustrations of the Life, Studies, and Writings of Shakespeare, Volume 2

Joseph Hunter - 1845
...the want of sufficient notice to make preparation for the reception of so illustrious a guest. I. 5. LADY MACBETH. The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. bearing of the milder and gentler spirit of the Thane which follows. The annotation...
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New Illustrations of the Life, Studies, and Writings of Shakespeare, Volume 2

Joseph Hunter - 1845
...sufficient notice to make preparation for the reception of so illustrious a guest. I. 5. LADY MACDETH. The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. The word " my " is purposely used by the Poet to let the audience into the spirit of...
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The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D: Including A Journal of His Tour ..., Volume 1

James Boswell - 1846
...out of it, a raven perched 364 HEBRIDES.] on one of the chimney-tops, and croaked. Then I repeated " The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan, Under my battlements." We dined at Mr. Keith's. Mrs. Keith was rather too attentive to Dr. Johnson, asking...
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The Works of Walter Savage Landor, Volume 1

Walter Savage Landor - 1846 - 676 pages
...faults committed by transcribers or printers may be corrected. In Macbeth, for example, we read, •• The raven himself Is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan," &c. Is there anything marvellous in a raven being hoarse'! which is implied by the word "himself:"...
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Shakespeare's Plays: With His Life, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1847
...Than would make up his message. Lady M. Give him tending : He brings great news. [Exit Attendant.] ueen. I will, my lord : I pray you, pardon me. King. It is the poison'd cup my battlements. Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me, from the...
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Elements of Criticism: With Analyses, and Translation of Ancient and Foreign ...

Lord Henry Home Kames - 1847 - 504 pages
...compose the fifth class. The Lady Macbeth, projecting the death of the King, has the following soliloquy: -The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan .Under my battlements. Come all you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from...
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A History of the County of Westchester, from Its First Settlement ..., Volume 1

Robert Bolton - 1848
...the approach of Duncan, whose death she had conspired, is made to say in the language of the poet, "The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements." — Macbeth, Act 1. scene 5. This ill omened bird, once, very numerous on our coasts,...
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Boswell's Life of Johnson: Including Their Tour to the Hebrides

James Boswell, John Wilson Croker - 1848 - 874 pages
...that a raven perched upon one of the chimney-tops, and croaked. Then I in my turit repeated — • The raven 4 my battlements.' " I wish you1 had been with us. Think what enthusiastic happiness I shall have to...
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