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" The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty ! make thick my blood ; Stop up... "
Chambers's Edinburgh Journal - Page 134
1844
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The Beauties of Shakespeare: Selected from Each Play : with a General Index ...

William Shakespeare, William Dodd - 1824 - 385 pages
...false, And yet wouldst wrongly win. highly, LADY MACBETH'S SOLILOQUY ON THE NEWS OF DUNCAN'S APPROACH. The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, come, you spirits That tend on mortal* thoughts, unsex me here; And fill me,...
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The life of Shakspeare; enquiries into the originality of his dramatic plots ...

Augustine Skottowe - 1824
...by his exertions to communicate with the utmost speed the news of the king's arrival at Inverness, " The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under these battlements." The imps supposed to be constantly attendant upon witches were mere modifications...
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The Life of Shakespeare: Enquiries Into the Originality of His ..., Volume 2

Augustine Skottowe - 1824
...by his exertions to communicate with the utmost speed the news of the king's arrival at Inverness, " The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under these battlements." The imps supposed to be constantly attendant upon witches were mere modifications...
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The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany, Volume 95

1825
...Kemble, that it is a reflection of Hamlet applicable to his own case, and quite on a par with that in Macbeth :— " The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements." • . Kemble gave the argument of the play in the finest manner possible — . " They...
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The Philomathic journal, Volume 2

Philomathic institution - 1825
...Kemble, that it is a reflection of Hamlet applicable to his own case, and quite on a par Jvith that in Macbeth : — . " ' The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements.' " Kemble gave the argument of the play in the finest manner possible — "'They do...
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Memoirs of the Life of John Philip Kemble, Esq: Including a ..., Volume 1

James Boaden - 1825 - 607 pages
...Kemble, that it is a reflection of Hamlet applicable to his own case, ind quite on a par with that in Macbeth : — "The raven himself is hoarse, " That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan " Under my battlements." Kemble gave the argument of the play in the finest manner possible — " They do but...
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Ornithologia, or The birds, a poem, in 2 pt., with an intr. to their natural ...

James Jennings (of Huntspill.) - 1828
...greedy Raven that for death doth call :" OWL. And quotes PLINY for his authority. And SHAKESPEARE, " The Raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my hattlements." Macbeth, Act i. Scene 5. * "I hired 'em at tha cottage door, , When uiornin, in tha...
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Ornithologia, Or The Birds: A Poem, in Two Parts with an ..., Parts 1-2

James Jennings - 1828 - 468 pages
...greedy Haven that for death doth call:" OWL. And quotes PLINY for his authority. And SHAKESPEARE, " The Raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my hattlements." Macbeth, Act i. Scene .5. * " I hired 'em at tha cottage door, When uiornin, in tha...
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American Ornithology: Or The Natural History of the Birds of the ..., Volume 1

Alexander Wilson, Charles Lucian Bonaparte, George Ord, William Maxwell Hetherington - 1831
...Macbeth, on being advised of the approach of Duncan, whose death she had conspired, thus exclaims: — The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements ! f The Moor of Venice says,— It comes o'er my memory, As doth the raven o'er the...
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Advice in the Pursuits of Literature: Containing Historical, Biographical ...

Samuel Lorenzo Knapp - 1832 - 296 pages
...drove onward to expected enjoyment and distinction. She spoke in all the boldness of her nature : — " The raven himself is hoarse, That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlement?. Come, come you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here ; And fill me from...
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