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" But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time, and capable of perpetual renovation. Neither are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking... "
Lectures Upon Shakspeare - Page 41
by Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 2001
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The Principles of Economical Philosophy, Volume 1

Henry Dunning Macleod - 1875
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds into the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...the most remote regions in participation of their fruite, how much more are letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass through the vast seas of time,...
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Cassell's library of English literature, selected, ed ..., Volume 4; Volume 80

Cassell, ltd - 1876
...arc they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...ships pass through the vast seas of time, and make agas so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other ?...
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The Works of Francis Bacon: Philosophical works

Francis Bacon - 1887
...opinions in succeeding ages. So that if the invention of the ship was thought so noble, which carried riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth...much more are letters to be magnified, which as ships pa?* through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations,...
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Some Aspects of the Greek Genius

Samuel Henry Butcher - 1893 - 321 pages
...they (books) fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages." Yet when we speak of life, whether actual, or, as in literature and art, metaphorical, we must remember...
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Francis Bacon and His Shakespeare

Theron Soliman Eugene Dixon - 1895 - 461 pages
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages." — Advancement of Learning, First Book. "Mir. Would I might But ever see that man ! Pros. Now I arise...
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University Bulletin, Volume 3

1898
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass through vast seas of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations and inventions,...
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The Public-school Journal: Devoted to the Theory and Art of ..., Volume 15

1895
...indefeasible possession; we can not get rid of them if we would. "If," declares Lord Bacon, "the intention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riches...through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions one of the other." The history of modern literature...
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The Advancement of Learning, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - 1898
...because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing 20 infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages :...remote regions in participation of their fruits, how ranch more are letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass tnrough the vast seas of time, and make...
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The Manchester Public Free Libraries: A History and Description, and Guide ...

Manchester Public Libraries (Manchester, England), William Robert Credland - 1899 - 283 pages
...Neither are they fitly called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds into the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...; so that if the invention of the ship was thought noble, which carrieth riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth the most remote...
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St. Nicholas

Mary Mapes Dodge - 1900
...writer's works. DID it ever occur to you that books and ships are alike ? Lord Bacon once said : " If the invention of the ship was thought so noble,...through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other ! " KRS fl AVay...
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