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" But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time, and capable of perpetual renovation. Neither are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking... "
Lectures Upon Shakspeare - Page 41
by Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 2001
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Bacon, His Writings and His Philosophy

George Lillie Craik - 1862 - 715 pages
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages : so that if ihe invention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities from place to...
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The two books of Francis Bacon: of the proficience and advancement of ...

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1863
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate s.till, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...carrieth riches and commodities from place to place, and cousociateth the most remote regions in participation of their fruits, how much more are letters to...
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Literature, its rise, progress, fortunes and advantages, an address

Charles Spence (of Liverpool.) - 1863
...Neither are they fitly called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...carrieth riches and commodities from place to place, and associateth the most remote regions in participation of their . fruits, how much more are Letters to...
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Prehistoric Man: Researches Into the Origin of Civilisation in the Old and ...

Sir Daniel Wilson - 1865 - 635 pages
...wherein man excelleth beasts" to that immortality whereunto man's nature doth aspire, exclaims : — " If the invention of the ship was thought so noble,...carrieth riches and commodities from place to place, and cousociateth the most remote regions in participation of their fruits : how much more are letters to...
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The Gentle Life: Essays in Aid of the Formation of Character

James Hain Friswell - 1866 - 303 pages
...qualities that Lord Bacon likened books to ships. " If," said that wise man, " ships are to be commended, how much more are letters to be magnified, which,...through the vast seas of Time, and make ages so distant participate in the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions one of the other !" Dear, precious indeed...
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Modern Culture, Its True Aims and Requirements: A Series of Addresses and ...

Edward Livingston Youmans - 1867 - 423 pages
...information from remote times as well as from distant places. " If the invention of the ship," says Bacon, " was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities...are letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions,...
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Three Books of Offices, Or Moral Duties: And His Cato Major, an Essay on Old ...

Marcus Tullius Cicero - 1868 - 343 pages
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass through tho vast seas of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions,...
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Studies in English prose: specimens, with notes, by J. Payne

Joseph Payne - 1868
...generate still. and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite (numberless) actions and opinions in succeeding ages. So that,...commodities from place to place, and consociateth (links together) the most remote regions in participation of their fruits, how much more are letters...
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Choice Specimens of English Literature: Selected from the Chief English ...

Thomas Budd Shaw, William Smith - 1869 - 477 pages
...ship was thought so noble, which carrict commodities from place to place and consociatcth the remotest regions in participation of their fruits, how much more are letters to be valued, which, like ships, pass through the vast ocean of time, and convey knowledge and inventions...
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Practical text-book of grammatical analysis

William Stewart Ross - 1870 - 56 pages
...turns his back, Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees By which he did ascend. — Shakspeare. If the invention of the ship was thought so noble,...commodities from place to place, and consociateth the most distant regions in participation of their fruits, how much more are letters to be magnified which,...
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