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" But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time, and capable of perpetual renovation. Neither are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking... "
Lectures Upon Shakspeare - Page 41
by Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 2001
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The Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: With an Introductory Essay ...

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1853
...images, btoauj": they irtutrnt': still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, prorokinz and camiw; infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages:...invention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riehes and commodities from place to place, and consoeiateth the most remote regions in participation...
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The National Magazine, Volume 3

Abel Stevens, James Floy - 1853
...properly be called images, because they cast forth seeds in the minds of men, railing and producing infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages ; so that if the invention of a ship was thought so noble and so wonderful, which transports riches and merchandise from place to...
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The Works of Lord Bacon: Philosophical works

Francis Bacon - 1854
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds consocinteth the most remote regions in participation of their fruits; how much more are letters to...
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The Miscellaneous Works, Volume 1

William Hazlitt - 1854
...nre they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and east their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...invention of the ship was thought so noble, which currieth riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth the most remote regions in participation...
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Cicero's Three Books of Offices, Or, Moral Duties: Also His Cato Major, an ...

Marcus Tullius Cicero - 1855 - 343 pages
...minds of others, provokin^and causing infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages ; so that 11 tho invention of the ship was thought so noble, which...commodities from place to place, and consociateth tho most remote regions in participation of their fruits, how much more are letters to be magnified,...
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Half-hours with the best authors, selected by C. Knight, Volume 2

Half hours - 1856
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...fruits, how much more are letters to be magnified, wliich, as ships, pass through the vast seas of time, and make ago so distant to participate of the...
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The Essays: Or, Counsels, Civil and Moral ; and The Wisdom of the Ancients

Francis Bacon - 1856 - 360 pages
...surpassed by none. Can aught excel the noble comparison of the ship ? The reader shall judge for himself. " If the invention of the ship was thought so noble,...more are letters to be magnified, which, as ships, puss through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations,...
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George Mogridge: His Life, Character, and Writings

Charles Williams - 1856 - 370 pages
...the ultimate reach and highest finish of intellect." " If," says Bacon, "ships are to be commended, how much more are letters to be magnified, which,...through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant participate of the wisdom, the illuminations, and inventions the one of the other?" So true are Schiller's...
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Recollections of a Literary Life, Or, Books, Places, and People, Volume 2

Mary Russell Mitford - 1857
...seem to know that he doth not." I add one very fine illustration : " If the invention of the stiip was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities...be magnified, which as ships pass through the vast sea of Time, and make ages so distant participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the...
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American Journal of Education, Volume 4

1857
...information from remote times as well as from distant places. "If the invention of the ship," says Bacon, "was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities...consociateth the most remote regions in participation of then- fruits, how much more are letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass the vast seas of time,...
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