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" But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time, and capable of perpetual renovation. Neither are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking... "
Lectures Upon Shakspeare - Page 41
by Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 2001
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A Discourse on the Life and Character of the Reverend John Thornton Kirkland ...

Alexander Young - 1840 - 104 pages
...clustered around his own fireside, and found * " If the invention of the ship," says Lord Bacon, " was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities...participation of their fruits, how much more are letters to he magnified, which, as ships, pass through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant participate...
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Discourses on the Life and Character of John Thornton Kirkland, and of ...

Alexander Young - 1840
...clustered around his own fireside, and found * " If the invention of the ship," says Lord Bacon, " was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities...regions in participation of their fruits, how much more arc letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass through the vast seas of time, and make ages so...
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Nugae Literariae: Prose and Verse

Richard Winter Hamilton - 1841 - 585 pages
...fine eulogium of Bacon, on knowledge in general, but peculiarly applicable to this species of it ? " If the invention of the ship was thought so noble,...the vast seas of time, and make ages, so distant, participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other." The credit attached...
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Nugae Literariae: Prose and Verse

Richard Winter Hamilton - 1841 - 585 pages
...fine eulogiiim of Bacon, on knowledge in general, but peculiarly applicable to this species of it ? " If the invention of the ship was thought so noble,...how much more are letters to be magnified, which, as chips pass through the vast seas of time, and make ages, so distant, participate of the wisdom, illuminations,...
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A Discourse on the Study of the Law of Nature and Nations

Sir James Mackintosh, J. G. Marvin - 1843 - 103 pages
...and wise men throughout all ages and nations of the world, ' If,' says Lord Bacon, ' the intention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riches...through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant, participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other !' Alas! gentlemen,...
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Cyclopædia of English Literature, Volume 1

Robert Chambers - 1844
...use and employment thereof. [Books and Shipt Compared.] If the invention of the ship was thought eo participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other ! [ S/liâtes.] Studies...
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Lectures on the Dramatic Literature of the Age of Elizabeth

William Hazlitt - 1845 - 218 pages
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...magnified, which, as ships, pass through the vast was of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions the...
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Characters of Shakespeare's Plays

William Hazlitt - 1845 - 229 pages
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...succeeding ages. So that, if the invention of the thip was thought so noble, which carricth riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth...
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Wade's London Review, Volumes 1-3

1845
...Neither are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still and cast their seed in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages.'* In conclusion, we cannot help thinking that the world would be much benefited by the revival of the...
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Bacon: His Writings, and His Philosophy

George Lillie Craik - 1846
...are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions...consociateth the most remote regions in participation ' their fruits, how much more are letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass through the vast seas...
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