Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" For, on that principle, the wedge-like snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage at the end, the little sunk eyes, and the whole make of the head, so well adapted to its offices of digging and rooting, would be extremely beautiful. "
The Architectural Magazine - Page 385
edited by - 1834
Full view - About this book

The Harvard Classics, Volume 24

Charles William Eliot - 1909
...this theory, I am apprehensive that experience was not sufficiently consulted. For, on that principle, the wedge-like snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage...digging and rooting, would be extremely beautiful. The great bag hanging to the bill of a pelican, a thing highly useful to this animal, would be likewise...
Full view - About this book

The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, Volume 1

Edmund Burke, Paul Langford - 1997 - 589 pages
...apprehensive that experience was not sufficiently consulted. For on that principle, the wedge-likea snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage at the...digging, and rooting, would be extremely beautiful. The great bag hanging to the bill of a pelican, a thing higbly useful to this animal, would be likewise...
Limited preview - About this book

Kant and the Experience of Freedom: Essays on Aesthetics and Morality

Paul Guyer - 1996 - 449 pages
..."I am apprehensive that experience was not sufficiently consulted." For example, "On that principle, the wedge-like snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage...offices of digging, and rooting, would be extremely beautiful."51 But Burke does follow Hume in rejecting Hutcheson's idea that there is a separate sense...
Limited preview - About this book

The Genealogy of Aesthetics

Ekbert Faas, Ekbert (York University Faas, Toronto) - 2002 - 439 pages
...Gerard, and others had associated beauty with fitness and utility; Burke countered that, by that token, "the wedge-like snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage...the whole make of the head, so well adapted to its office of digging, and rooting, would be extremely beautiful."131 Shaftesbury, Spence, and Hutcheson...
Limited preview - About this book

Values of Beauty: Historical Essays in Aesthetics

Paul Guyer, Jonathan Nelson Professor of Humanities and Philosoph Paul Guyer - 2005 - 359 pages
...theory," he scornfully observes, "experience was not sufficiently consulted": For on that principle, the wedgelike snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage...digging, and rooting, would be extremely beautiful. The great bag hanging to the bill of a pelican, a thing highly useful to this animal, would be likewise...
Limited preview - About this book

Taste: A Literary History

Denise Gigante - 2008 - 272 pages
...above all a "social quality" pertaining to taste.51 If fitness were a cause of beauty, he argues, then "the wedge-like snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage...digging, and rooting, would be extremely beautiful" (PE 105). When applied to swine, the term rooting means to dig with the snout in search of food, though...
Limited preview - About this book

Berkeley and Irish Philosophy

David Berman - 2005 - 234 pages
...drawn from ugly but useful domestic animals. Thus he notes that if the utility theory were correct 'the wedge-like snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage...the whole make of the head, so well adapted to its office of digging and rooting, would be extremely beautiful'. For Hutcheson, as we have seen, also...
Limited preview - About this book

The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke

Edmund Burke - 2008 - 572 pages
...this theory, I am appreheusive that experience was not sufficiently consulted For, on that principle, the wedge-like snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage...digging and rooting, would be extremely beautiful. The great bag hanging to the bill of a pelican, a thing highly useful to this animal, would be likewise...
Limited preview - About this book

The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke

Edmund Burke - 2008 - 572 pages
...this theory, I am apprehengive that experience was not sufficiently consulted For, on that principle, the wedge-like snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage...adapted to its offices of digging and rooting, would he extremely beautiful. The great bag hanging to the bill of a pelican, a thing highly useful to this...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF