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" Come, come, and sit you down ; you shall not budge ; You go not till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you. "
Familiar Proverbial and Select Sayings from Shakspere - Page 112
by William Shakespeare, John B. Marsh - 1863 - 162 pages
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Coming of Age in Shakespeare

Marjorie B. Garber - 1997 - 248 pages
...mother in her closet, determined to persuade her of her errors. 'You shall not budge,' he tells her, You go not till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you ! (m. iv. 19-21) Hamlet, with his 'antic disposition' and his feigned - or real madness, is another...
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John Barrymore, Shakespearean Actor

Michael A. Morrison - 1997 - 418 pages
...doum; (he pushes her back to the chair, and she sits)263 You shallnot BUDGE;/ You go not till I setyou up a glass/ Where you may see the inmost part of you." The Queen replies, "What wilt thou do? thou wilt not murder me? (she starts up from the chair toward...
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Strands Afar Remote: Israeli Perspectives on Shakespeare

Avraham Oz - 1998 - 307 pages
...Hamlet is insistent about this wish to fashion a mother whose heart consists of "penetrable stuff": "You go not till I set you up a glass / Where you may see the inmost part of you" (11. 18-19). (Hamlet's rather convoluted syntax here — "I set you up a glass" — leaves open the...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 52

Stanley Wells - 2003 - 352 pages
...English Literature, 38 (1998), 251-64. 2. SHAKESPEARE'S LIFE, TIMES, AND STAGE reviewed by ALISON FINDLAY You go not till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you (Hamlet 3.4.19-20) Peter Holland concludes his book English Shakespeares by praising foreign productions...
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Talking Radio: An Oral History of American Radio in the Television Age

...my mother. QUEEN: HAMLET: Nay then, I'll set those to you that can speak. Come, come, and sit down; you shall not budge; You go not, till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you. QUEEN: POLONIUS: (off). HAMLET: (sound of drawing; POLONIUS: QUEEN: HAMLET: QUEEN: HAMLET: QUEEN: HAMLET:...
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The Vanishing: Shakespeare, the Subject, and Early Modern Culture

Christopher Pye, Class of 1924 Professor of English at Williams College Christopher Pye - 2000 - 199 pages
...matter for modern accounts of the subject? Hamlet: Come, come, and sit you down, you shall not boudge; You go not till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you. Queen: What wilt thou do? Thou wilt not murther me? Help ho! Polonius: [Behind] What ho, help! Hamlet:...
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Deadly Thought: Hamlet and the Human Soul

Jan H. Blits - 2001 - 405 pages
...(3.4.16). Hamlet, restraining Gertrude, forces her to sit and listen: Come, come, and sit you down, you shall not budge. You go not till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you. (3.4.17-19) Hamlet speaks metaphorically and allusively. He evidently means that he will show Gertrude...
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The Klingon Hamlet

Lawrence Schoen - 2001 - 240 pages
...— you are my mother. Nay, then, I'll set those to you that can speak. Come, come, and sit you down; you shall not budge; You go not till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you. What wilt thou do? thou wilt not murder me? — Help, help, ho! [Behind] What, ho! help, help, help!...
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Hamlet: The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke : the First Folio of 1623 ...

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 261 pages
...mother. Queen Nay, then I'll set those to you that can speak. Hamlet Come, come, and sit you down. You shall not budge. You go not till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you. Queen What wilt thou do? Thou wilt not murder me? Help, help, ho! Polonius [Behind the arras] What,...
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Hearing the Measures: Shakespearean and Other Inflections

George Thaddeus Wright - 2001 - 327 pages
...falsifies. The mirrors of other persons, of the clouds, of ghosts; the glass of fashion; the glass of guilt ("You go not till I set you up a glass / Where you may see the inmost part of you" [3.4.19-20]); even the mirror of art, the play with its Italian murder mirror—all these, though they...
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