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" We were told, that universal benevolence was what first cemented society ; we were taught to consider all the wants of mankind as our own ; to regard ' the human face divine' with affection and esteem; he wound us up to be mere machines of pity, and rendered... "
The Eclectic Review - Page 561
edited by - 1859
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Letters from a Citizen of the World

Oliver Goldsmith - 1854 - 127 pages
...U>ihuman face dic'me with affection and estfem : h>wound us up to be mere machines of pity, and 27 rendered us incapable of withstanding the slightest...impulse made either by real or fictitious distress : in :i луип!, we were perfectly instructed in the arts of giving away thousands, before we were taught...
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A History of the Earth, and Animated Nature

Oliver Goldsmith - 1854 - 998 pages
...mankind as our own ; to regard the human face dirine with affection and esteem ; he wound us up to he mere machines of pity, and rendered us incapable of withstanding the slightest impulse made eitlier by real or fictitious distress. In a word, we were perfectly instructed in the art of giving...
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The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith: Including a Variety ..., Volume 2

Oliver Goldsmith, Sir James Prior - 1854
...slightest impulse, made either by real or fietitious distress ; in a word, we were perfeetly instrueted in the art of giving away thousands, before we were taught the more neeessary qualifieations of getting a farthing. •' I eannot avoid imagining, that thus refined by...
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The Life and Times of Oliver Goldsmith

John Forster - 1855 - 472 pages
...mankind as our own ; to regard the human face divine "with affection and esteem ; he wound us up to be mere machines "of pity, and rendered us incapable...necessary qualifications of getting "a farthing." Acquisitions highly primitive, and supporting what seems to have been the common fame of the Goldsmith...
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The Miscellaneous Works: Letters from a citizen of the world, to his friend ...

Oliver Goldsmith - 1856
...mankind as onr own ; to regard ' the human face divine ' with affection and esteem ; he wound us up to be mere machines of pity, and rendered us incapable of...more necessary qualifications of getting a farthing. '• I cannot avoid imagining, that thus refined by his lessons • [In this story are contained portions...
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The Family mirror

1856
...mankind as our own; to regard the human face divine with afl'cctioii and esteem ; he wound us up to be mere machines of pity, and rendered us incapable of...of giving away thousands before we were taught the necessary qualification of getting a farthing." 200 HOWTH. THEliK arc few in this kingdom who have...
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Biographical sketch. Poetical extracts. Miscellaneous essays. From The bee ...

Washington Irving - 1858
...with affection and esteem ; he wound us up to be mere machines of pity, and rendered us inca. pable of withstanding the slightest impulse made either...of giving away thousands before we were taught the necessary qualifications of getting a farthing." In the Deserted Village we have another picture of...
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The poetical and prose works of Oliver Goldsmith, with life

Oliver Goldsmith - 1859 - 560 pages
...mankind as our own -, to regard the human face divine with affeetion and estcem : he wound us up to be mere machines of pity, and rendered us incapable of...withstanding the slightest impulse made either by real or fietitious distress : in a word, we were perfeetly instrueted in the arts of giving away thousands,...
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The Elements of the English Language

Ernest Adams - 1862 - 253 pages
...remains unaltered : " He was promised every indulgence." This remark applies equally to the verb teach. We were perfectly instructed in the art of giving away thousands, before we were taught the necessary qualification, of getting a farthing. — Goldsmith. We were taught [to consider all the...
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Irving's Works, Volume 9

Washington Irving - 1864
...mankind as our own ; to regard the human face divine with affection and esteem ; he wound us up to be mere machines of pity, and rendered us incapable of...of giving away thousands before we were taught the necessary qualifications of getting a farthing." In the " Deserted Village " we have another picture...
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