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" I venture to say that every man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale of the Constitution. "
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Page 276
1865
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The Mid-Victorian Generation, 1846-1886

K. Theodore Hoppen - 2000 - 787 pages
...was this: F.very man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale of the Constitution. Of course, in giving utterance to such a proposition, I do not recede from the protest I have previously...
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Defining the Victorian Nation: Class, Race, Gender and the British Reform ...

Catherine Hall, Keith McClelland, Jane Rendall - 2000 - 303 pages
...1864, that 'every man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfnness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale of the constitution'.6 Gladstone became Chancellor of the Exchequer in Russell's government. On 1 2 March...
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Gladstone Centenary Essays

David Bebbington, Roger Swift - 2000 - 286 pages
...phrase, 'that every man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale of the Constitution'.49 This principle sounded novel and radical, but Gladstone, as he pointed out to Palmerston,...
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Britain, 1846-1964: The Challenge of Change

Martin Roberts - 2001 - 288 pages
...Source 6 [Any man] who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger. is morally entitled to come within the pale of the constitution. Gladstone in the Commons in 1864 Source 7 The future principle of English politics will not be a levelling...
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Liberalism and Conservatism, 1846-1905

David Paterson - 2001 - 268 pages
...said was: 'Every man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale (limit) of the constitution.' He went on to assure the House of Commons that he was still against 'sudden...
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A History of the Peoples of the British Isles, Volume 3

Stanford E. Lehmberg, Thomas William Heyck - 2002 - 344 pages
...declared that "every man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal fitness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale of the constitution." The death of Palmerston in 1865 unleashed the holders of such views. Reformers in the Parliament of...
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Gladstone

Michael Partridge - 2003 - 284 pages
...stated that 'every man who is not personally incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale of the constitution'. Faced with a furious outcry, even from some on the Liberal benches, Gladstone hastily backtracked....
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Britain, 1846-1919

Jocelyn Hunt - 2003 - 399 pages
...in 1864: 'Every man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale of the constitution.'6 Gladstone was unusual in his claim that the right to vote should be a universal rather...
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War of Words: Language, Politics and 9/11

Sandra Silberstein - 2004 - 197 pages
...believing that 'every man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger is morally entitled to come within the pale of the Constitution'.1 Indeed, 'I do not admit that the working man, regarded as an individual, is less worthy...
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The English Constitution: Myths and Realities

Ian Ward - 2004 - 213 pages
...Gladstone, 'every man who is not presumably incapacitated by some consideration of personal unfitness or of political danger, is morally entitled to come within the pale of the constitution'.30 Disraeli, it seemed, had got it wrong. The age of democracy, or at least a kind of...
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