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" Yet do I fear thy nature ; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way. "
Macbeth, from the text of S. Johnson and G. Steevens, revised - Page 13
by William Shakespeare - 1784
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Stage Dialects

Jerry Blunt - 1994 - 156 pages
...Lay it to thy heart, and farewell." Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be What thou art promised. Yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o' the milk...kindness To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great, Reading for Fluency 99 Art not without ambition, but without The illness should attend it. What thou...
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Macbeth (MAXNotes Literature Guides)

Rebecca Sheinberg - 2015 - 99 pages
...do the Witches make for Macbeth and Banquo? 7. What does Lady Macbeth mean when she says of Macbeth, "Yet do I fear thy nature. It is too full o' the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way"? 8. Macbeth is having second thoughts about killing Duncan. What are the reasons he gives? Based on...
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The Absent Shakespeare

Mark Jay Mirsky - 1994 - 174 pages
...pity is felt as despicable, likewise the breast, because it leaks pity. Lady Macbeth alludes to this: "Yet do I fear thy nature. / It is too full o' the milk of human kindness." The will to transgress against nature, one's own nature, is an obsession of the play. . . . Make thick...
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Why Smart People Do Dumb Things: Lessons from the New Science of Behavioral ...

Mortimer Feinberg, John J. Tarrant - 1995 - 284 pages
...her husband would make it to the top—- but that he lacked the necessary sickness to keep him there: Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be What thou art promis'd. Yet I do fear thy nature; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way; thou wouldst...
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Dona i literatura

Ferran Carbó - 1997 - 302 pages
...tragedia al confiar en el lenguaje de la firmeza. Con una crítica mordaz a la naturaleza de su esposo (" Yet do I fear thy nature: it is too full o' the milk of human kindness, to catch the nearest way."), demasiado llena de bondad para consumar con rapidez un propósito, Lady Macbeth revela al público...
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The Wordsworth Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - 1998 - 669 pages
...his death To throw away the dearest thing he owed As 'twere a careless trifle. 10345 Macbeth Yet I do d it drives newscasters berserk. MERSEY John 1914-1993 4595 Journalism allows it's read 10346 Macbeth The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements....
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The Complete Idiot's Guide to Shakespeare

Laurie Rozakis - 1999 - 380 pages
...of the King's plans (and her husband's ambitions), Lady Macbeth worries that her hubby's character is "too full o' the milk of human kindness, / To catch the nearest way." Ever supportive, she asks the spirits to "unsex" her (take away her femininity) so she can help her...
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Shakespeare After Theory

David Scott Kastan, George M Bodman Professor of English David Scott Kastan - 1999 - 264 pages
...quickly" (1.7.1-2). Even Lady Macbeth cannot fully articulate his prophesied progress to the throne: "Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be / What thou art promis'd" (1.5.14-15), not "King," as the witches' three-fold prophecy demands, but merely the paraphrastic "What...
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Macbeth

William Shakespeare - 2000 - 98 pages
...be What thou art promised. Yet do I fear thy nature. It is too full o' th' milk of human kindness 17 To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great, Art not without ambition, but without 19 The illness should attend it. What thou wouldst highly, 20 That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not...
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Macbeth : a Play in One Act

Lindsay Price - 2001 - 33 pages
...farewell." She folds up the letter. Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be What thou art promised: yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness. [SEYTON enters] What is your tidings? SEYTON: The king comes here tonight. LADY MACBETH: Thou'rt mad...
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