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" Yet do I fear thy nature ; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way. "
Macbeth, from the text of S. Johnson and G. Steevens, revised - Page 13
by William Shakespeare - 1784
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The Complete Idiot's Guide to Shakespeare

Laurie Rozakis - 1999 - 380 pages
...of the King's plans (and her husband's ambitions), Lady Macbeth worries that her hubby's character is "too full o' the milk of human kindness, / To catch the nearest way." Ever supportive, she asks the spirits to "unsex" her (take away her femininity) so she can help her...
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Shakespeare After Theory

David Scott Kastan, George M Bodman Professor of English David Scott Kastan - 1999 - 264 pages
...quickly" (1.7.1-2). Even Lady Macbeth cannot fully articulate his prophesied progress to the throne: "Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be / What thou art promis'd" (1.5.14-15), not "King," as the witches' three-fold prophecy demands, but merely the paraphrastic "What...
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The Tragedies

William Shakespeare, George Rylands - 1959 - 1362 pages
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Plays, Volume 2

David Pownall - 2002
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CR. The Centennial Review, Volume 22

1978
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Macbeth

William Shakespeare - 2000 - 98 pages
...be What thou art promised. Yet do I fear thy nature. It is too full o' th' milk of human kindness 17 To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great, Art not without ambition, but without 19 The illness should attend it. What thou wouldst highly, 20 That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not...
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Macbeth : a Play in One Act

Lindsay Price - 2001 - 33 pages
...farewell." She folds up the letter. Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be What thou art promised: yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness. [SEYTON enters] What is your tidings? SEYTON: The king comes here tonight. LADY MACBETH: Thou'rt mad...
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Lies Like Truth: Shakespeare, Macbeth, and the Cultural Moment

Arthur F. Kinney - 2001 - 341 pages
...What thou art promis'd: yet doe 1 feare thy Nature, It is too full o'th'Milke of humane kindnesse. To catch the nearest way. Thou would'st be great, Art not without Ambition, but without The illnesse should attend it. What thou would'st highly, That would'st thou holily: would'st not play...
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Metaphors Dictionary

Dorrie Weiss - 2001 - 672 pages
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The Loves of Shakespeare's Women

Susannah York, William Shakespeare - 2001 - 112 pages
...prophecy to him, 'Thou shalt be king hereafter'. LADY MACBETH Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shait be What thou art promis'd. Yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full of the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way; thou wouldst be great, Art not without ambition...
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