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" Thus this custom of firing houses continued, till in process of time, says my manuscript, a sage arose, like our Locke, who made a discovery, that the flesh of swine, or indeed of any other animal, might be cooked (burnt, as they called it) without the... "
The Boys' and girls' companion for leisure hours, ed. by J. and M. Bennett - Page 159
1857
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The essays of Elia. [Followed by] The last essays of Elia

Charles Lamb - 1867
...People built slighter and -slighter every p^lj^.was feared that the very science of architecture i would in no long, time be lost to the world. Thus...a discovery that the flesh of swine, or indeed of sypjj-fljtber animal, might be cooked (burnt, as they called it) without the necessity of consuming...
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Works: Including His Most Intesesting Letters

Charles Lamb - 1867 - 648 pages
...acienc* at architecture would in no long time be lott to the world. Thus this custom of firing boras continued, till in process of time, says my manuscript,...our Locke, who made a discovery that the flesh of sirine, or indeed of any other *i"*l t might fc* cooked (burnt, as they called it) without the...
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The Book of Elegant Extracts

Book - 1868 - 159 pages
...all shut up shop. People built slighter and slighter every day, 75 until it was feared that the very science of architecture would in no long time be lost...firing houses continued, till, in process of time, says the manuscript, a sage arose, like our Locke, who made a discovery that the flesh of swine, or indeed...
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Smaller specimens of English literature, with notes. Ed. by W. Smith

sir William Smith - 1869
...and all shut up shop. People built slighter and slighter every day, until it was feared that the very science of architecture would in no long time be lost...indeed of any other animal, might be cooked (burnt, as they called it) without the necessity of consuming a whole house to dress it. Then first began the...
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The Essays of Elia

Charles Lamb - 1869 - 436 pages
...and all shut up shop. People built slighter and slighter every day, until it was feared that the very science of architecture would in no long time be lost...swine, or indeed of any other animal, might be cooked (Jiurnt, as they called it) without the necessity of consuming a whole house to dress it. Then first...
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Choice Specimens of English Literature: Selected from the Chief English ...

Thomas Budd Shaw, William Smith - 1869 - 477 pages
...all shut up shop. People bu'.lt slighter and slighter every day, until it was feared that the very science of architecture would in no long time be lost...sage arose, like our Locke, who made a discovery, tint the flesh of swine, or indeed of any other animal, might te cooked (burnt, as they called it)...
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Transactions of the ... Session of the American Institute of Homoeopathy

American Institute of Homeopathy - 1869
...wings, and nothing but fires were seen in every direction, until at length a sage arose who made the discovery that the flesh of swine, or indeed of any other animal, might be cooked without the necessity of consuming a whole house. Then first began the rude form of a gridiron. Roasting...
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Murby's Excelsior readers, ed. by F. Young

Francis Young (F.R.G.S.) - 1870
...and all shut up shop. People built slighter and slighter every day, until it was feared that the very science of architecture would in no long time be lost...firing houses continued, till, in process of time, says the manuscript, a sage arose, like our Locke, who made a discovery that the flesh of swine, or indeed...
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A Hand-book of English Literature Intended for the Use of High Schools, as ...

Francis Henry Underwood - 1871 - 608 pages
...and all shut up shop. People built slighter and slighter every day, until it was feared that the very science of architecture would in no long time be lost...indeed of any other animal, might be cooked (burnt, as they called it) without the necessity of consuming a whole house to dress it. Then first began the...
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A Thousand and One Gems of English Prose

Charles Mackay - 1872 - 534 pages
...and all shut up shop. People built slighter and slighter every day, until it was feared that the very science of architecture would in no long time be lost...indeed of any other animal, might be cooked (burnt, as they call it) without the necessity of consuming a whole house to dress it. Then first began the rude...
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