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" He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of the ... - Page xci
by William Shakespeare - 1803
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A Compendium of English Literautre: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1863
...served up to us in a diluted state by many a modern critic:—" To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it—you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation:...
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Scraps. [An anthology, ed.] by H. Jenkins

esq Henry Jenkins - 1864
...imitated, while he was yet deformed with all the improprieties which ignorance and neglect could accumulate upon him, while the reading was yet not rectified,...the images of nature were still present to him, and drew them not laboriously, but luckily ; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel...
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Shakespere's garden; or, The plants and flowers named in his works described ...

Sidney Beisly - 1864
...Dryden, who read Shakspere's works before any corrections or emendations were made, says : ' Shakspere was the man who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily ; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. John Milton, when he was 24 years of age, wrote the...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1865 - 776 pages
...served up to us in a diluted state by many a modeiu critic: — "To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...drew them, not laboriously, but luckily : when he descrilws any thing, you more than see it — you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted...
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Shakespeare's Editors and Commentators

William Robson Arrowsmith - 1865 - 52 pages
...the Shrew, Henry V., and a Midsummer Night's Dream, poets, and perhaps some ancient, as possessing "the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the...them not laboriously, but luckily; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it." In 1675, Edward Phillips, nephew of the poet Milton,...
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Graduated exercises for translation into German, extr. from Engl. authors ...

Friedrich Otto Froembling - 1866
...24th), in the seventieth year of her age, and forty-fifth of her reign. Hume. SHAKSPEAKE AND BEN JONSON. Shakspeare was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps...them not laboriously, but luckily. When he describes anything, you more than see it — you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give...
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The literary reader: prose authors, with biogr. notices &c. by H.G. Robinson

Hugh George Robinson - 1867
...of them, in my opinion, at least his equal, perhaps his superior. To begin, then, with Shakspere. He was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them, not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes anything, you more than see it — you feel it too. Those who 3accuse him to have wanted learning,...
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Studies of Shakspere

Charles Knight - 1868 - 560 pages
...imaginary conversation in which the Earl of Dorset bears a part : " To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give...
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The Book of Elegant Extracts

Book - 1868 - 159 pages
...the flame ; — Oh! need 1 tell that passion's name? Sir W. SHAKESPEARE AND BEN JONSON. CHAKESPEARE was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily. When he describes anything, you more than see it — you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give...
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Studies in English prose: specimens, with notes, by J. Payne

Joseph Payne - 1868
...right to command JOHN DRYDEN.1 1. SHAKSPEARE.' (7BOM THB "ESSAY OF DRAMATIC POESY," PUBLISHED IN 1667.) SHAKSPEARE was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps...comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still (constantly) present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes anything,...
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