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" He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of the ... - Page xci
by William Shakespeare - 1803
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1856 - 776 pages
...metal, of lower value though of greater bulk. 1 ' 1 SHAKSPEARE. To begin, then, with Shakspcare. He was the man, who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it—you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learninúr, give him the greater commendation:...
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Studies in English poetry [an anthology] with biogr. sketches and notes by J ...

Joseph Payne - 1856
..."Macbeth," and " Hamlet," are the most admired. CHARACTERISTIC' SPIRIT AND STYLE. — "He [Shakspere] was the man, who of all modern and perhaps ancient...present to him, and he drew them not laboriously but (1) Steevens. luckily : when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who...
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The Plays & Poems of Shakespeare: Life of Shakespeare. Dr. Johnson's preface ...

William Shakespeare - 1857
...SHAK •• i. h deformed with all the improprieties which ignorance and neglect could accumulate on him ; while the reading was yet not rectified, nor...comprehensive soul. All the images of Nature were Btill present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, hut luckily : when he describes any thing,...
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Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1848 - 776 pages
...state by many a modern critic: — "To begin, therewith Shakspeare. He was the man who, of all mcKlern and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most...describes any thing, you more than see it — you feel it loo. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally...
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A series of graduated exercises adapted to Morel's Grammar and analysis

John Daniel Morell - 1857
...Write out the following passages, substituting pronouns in place of the repeated nouns : — Shakspere was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...soul. All the images of nature were still present to Shakspere ; and Shakspere drew them, not laboriously but luckily. Those who accuse Shakspere of having...
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Biographical Sketches of Eminent British Poets: Chronologically Arranged ...

1857 - 508 pages
...the man, who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive sonl. All the images of nature were still present to him,...laboriously, but luckily. When he describes any thing, yon more than see it—- you feel it too. Those who accuse him of having wanted learning, give him...
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A class-book of English prose, with biogr. notices, explanatory notes and ...

Robert Demaus - 1859
...and nothing lost out of nature, though everything is altered. 3. SHAKSPERE AND BEN JONSON. Shakspcre was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily. When he describes anything, you more than see it— you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give...
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, Volume 2

John Dryden - 1859
...of them, in my opinion, at least his equal, perhaps his superior.* To hegin then with Shakspeare. He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were •;till present to him, and he drew them not lahoriously, hut luckily : when he deserihes any thing,...
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The Prose and Prose Writers of Britain from Chaucer to Ruskin: With ...

Robert Demaus - 1860 - 552 pages
...and nothing lost out of nature, though everything is altered. 3. SHAKSPERE AND BEN JONSON. Shakspere was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily. When he describes anything, you more than see it — you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give...
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A Catalogue of Books, the Property of a Political Economist: With Critical ...

John Ramsay McCulloch - 1862 - 394 pages
...a model of encomiastic criticism ; exact without minuteness, and lofty without exaggeration." " He was the man, who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily. When he describes anything, you more than see it — you feel it too. They who accuse him of wanting learning give him...
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