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THE SCHOOL BOARD READERS.

STANDARD V.

ADAPTED TO THF REQUIREMENTS OF THE NEW CODE, 1871.

EDITED BY

A FORMER H.M. INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.

U

LONDON:
CHARLES GRIFFIN AND COMPANY,

STATIONERS' HALL COURT.

1872.

PREFACE.

It is hoped that this book will prove a really valuable Reading-Book for the First Class of the School. The selections are interesting, varied, and instructive; and being selected from the best modern authors, will be found to contain specimens of the best English composition.

Pieces for Dictation are placed at the end of the book instead of at the end of each passage.

Above three hundred examples in Arithmetic have been given in Practice and Bills of Parcels ; and also Rules for working sums in the metric system, and about one hundred and fifty examples in the same.

675-34

REQUIREMENTS OF THE NEW CODE, 1871. READING.—A short ordinary paragraph in a newspaper, or other modern narrative.

WRITING.—Another short ordinary paragraph in a newspaper, or other modern narrative, slowly dictated once, by a few words at a time. ARITHMETIC.—Practice and Bills of Parcels. “In all schools the children in Standards V. and VI.

should know the principles of the Metric System, and be able to explain the advantages to be gained from uniformity in the method of forming multiples and sub-multiples of the unit.”

THE SCHOOL BOARD READERS.

STANDARD V.

PART 1.

MISCELLANEOUS SELECTIONS.

THE FRENCH ORPHAN. ONE evening in the month of January, as Mark Connel, a poor labourer who lived near the quay in Dublin was seated with his family round the fire, whose dying embers warned them that it was nearly time for rest, they were startled by a knocking at the door, which was repeated after a short interval. As their room was on the ground-floor, the knocking evidently proceeded from some one in the street ; and rightly imagining it to be a poor wayfarer who came to ask hospitality, Mark instantly sent one of the children to open the door, saying, “Make haste, Barny; I would not keep a dog outside the door on such a night as this.” The boy obeyed, and admitted a stranger, who entered with tottering steps, which showed him to be weakened by illness. A girl about eleven years old was endeavouring to support him. “Sit down, good man,” said Mrs. Connel, placing a stool for her guest; "you appear to be very weak; I am afraid you are ill.” The poor man answered in broken English, which it was almost impossible to understand. It was plain, however, that he was a foreigner, and in great distress ; and that was enough to make the good people exert themselves to assist him as far as their slender means enabled them. Mrs. Connel put more turf on the fire, and prepared some refreshment for the sick man, while the children took the little girl under their protection. The next day the stranger endeavoured to relate to them the misfortunes which had brought him to such a state of destitution. Owing to his imperfect English they had much difficulty in making out his story, though it was not a long one. Pierre Dubois—for that was his name-was a Frenchman, who had come to Dublin with the

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