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× Muchantable opinions of each other. folly of-p.

Pleaders, few of them tolerable company
Pleasant fellows to be avoided

Pleasantry, in conversation, the faults it covers Pleasure, when our chief pursuit, disappoints itself

The deceitfulness of Pleasure Pleasure and pain, a marriage proposed between them, and concluded.

553.

Pliny, the necessary qualifications of a fine
speaker according to that author.
His letter to his wife's aunt Hispulla
Plutarch, for what reproved by the Spectator
Poems in picture.

267

The chief things to be considered in epic poem Several poems preserved for their similes 421 Poetesses, (English) wherein remarkable Poetry has the whole circle of nature for its pro

51

vince

Poets, (English) reproved

Their artifices

Bad poets given to envy and detraction
The chief qualification of a good poet
The pains they should take to form the imagi-

port of the French king's death Of Giles's

Of Jenny Man s

Of Will's

Of the temple

Of Fish-street

nation .

417

418

Should mend Nature, and add to her beauties 418 How much they are at liberty in it. Polite imagination let into a great many pleasures the vulgar are not capable of x Politicians, the mischief they do

Some at the Royal Exchange

Politics of St. James's coffee-house, on the re

Of Cheapside

Of Garraway's

419 39, 40

44

253

314

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Poll, a way of arguing

Polycarpus, a man beloved by every body

Pontignan, (Mons.) his adventure with two wo

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No.

197

462

462

151

151

183

484

525

483 58

His artifice to raise a clap

Powell, (junior) his great skill in motions

His performance referred to the opera of Rinaldo and Armida

Power, despotic, an unanswerable argument against it

411 556 568

403 403

403

403

239

280

90

430

523

188

101

Psalm 114th translated
Psalmist against hypocrisy
Of Providence

Punch, out in the moral part

403

Punchinello frequented more than the church 403 Punishments in schools disapproved 403 Punning recommended by the practice of all

403

150 464

31

40

14

14

287

Practice and example, their prevalency on youth 337
Praise, the love of it implanted in us

A generous mind the most sensible of it
Why not freely conferred on men till dead
When changed into fame.
Prayers, Phoenix's allegorical description of them

38, 467
238
349

551

to Achilles in Homer

X

× Fine illustrate of p. 3456x

391

The folly and extravagance of our prayers in general, make set forms necessary. Precipice, distant, why its prospect pleases Prediction, the many arts of it in use among the vulgar.

391 418

505 101

Prejudice, the prevalency of it

A letter about it, as it respects parties in England

432 Prerogative, when and how asserted with ho

nour

Pride, a great enemy to a fine face

480 33 201

A man crazed with it, a mortifying sight

A chief spring of action in most men Printing encouraged by politest nations in Europe

Procrastination, from whence proceeding
Procuress, her trade

Prodicus, the first inventor of fables
Professions, the three great ones overburdened
with practitioners

Projector, a short description of one
Promisers condemned

Promises, (neglect of) through frivolous falsehood

Pronunciation necessary to an orator
Proper, (Will) an honest tale bearer

Prospect, a beautiful one, delights the soul as much as a demonstration

The definition of a pun

Whose privilege

A pun of thought

By whom punning is affected Punsters, their talents

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ages

In what age the pun chiefly flourished
A famous university much infested with it
Why banished at present out of the learned
world.

Wide ones pleasing to the fancy
Enlivened by rivers and falls of water
That of hills and valleys soon tires .

Prospect of peace, a poem on that subject com-
mended by the Spectator

523

237

Prosperity, to what compared by Seneca
Proverbs (the 7th chapter of) turned into verse
Providence demonstrative arguments for it 120
Not to be fathomed by reason

410

237

Prudence, the influence it has on our good or ill-fortune in the world

Puss, speculations on an old and a young one Puzzle, (Tom) an eminent immethodical dispu

QUACK bill.

Doctors, the cheats of them

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His advice to his scholars about examining at night what they had done in the day

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Na 394

365

191

205

183

Question, a curious one started by a schoolman about the choice of present and future hap piness and misery

Quidnunc, (Thos.) his letters to the Spectator

21 31

448

about news

Quir, (Peter de) his letter to the Spectator about puns

.

Quixotte, (Don) patron of the Sighers' Club

448 541 19

411

411

412

412

293

461

399

441

tant

Pyramids of Egypt

Pythagoras, his precepts about the choice of a course of life .

447

14

14

157

61 61

61

61

396

454

504

504

626

444

444

An essay against quacks by Dr. Z. Pearce 572 Quakers, project of an act to marry them to the olive beauties

·

476

415

586

396 340

34

219 625

575

625

396 30

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passion

Rebus, a kind of false wit among the ancients And our own countrymen

A rebus at Blenheim-house condemned Recitative, (Italian) not agreeable to an English audience

Recitative music in every language ought to be adapted to the accent of the language Recreation, the necessity of it Religion, the greatest incentive to good and worthy actions Considered

A morose melancholy behaviour, which is observed in several precise professors of religion, reproved by the Spectator The true spirit of, composes and cheers the soul

Renatus Valentinus, his father and grandfather, their story Rentfree, (Sabina) her letter about the green sickness

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INDEX.

Richlieu, (Cardinal) his politics made France the terror of Europe

No.

510

454

582

40

6

120

408

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408 59

59

59

29

29 258

The usefulness of it

Reproof, when justly deserved, how we ought
to behave under it
Reputation a species of fame

The stability of it, if well founded Retirement, the pleasure of it where truly enjoyed

4 425

A dream of it Revelation, what light it gives to the joys of heaven

600

316 459

494

494

426

431

487 487

382 218 218

611

429

294

464

Riding, a healthy exercise

Riding-dress of ladies, the extravagance of it
Rival mother, the first part of her history
Robin, the porter at Will's coffee-house, his
qualification

398

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455

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.

Her hymn to Venus

A fragment of Sappho's translated into three
different languages

Satire, Whole Duty of Man,' turned into one
Satires, English ribaldry and Billingsgate
Panegyrical on ourselves

Satirists best instruct us in the manners of their
respective times
Scandal, to hom most pleasing
How monstrous it renders us
Scales, (golden) a dream of them

Scaramouch an expedient of his at Paris
Scarfs, the vanity of some clergymen's wear-
ing them

·

Scholar's egg, what so called

Schoolmasters, the ignorance and want of discernment in the generality of them 157, 168, 313 Schoolmen their ass case 191 How applied 191

Scipio, his judgment of Marius when a boy 157
'Scornful lady,' Spectator's observations at that
play

Scot, (Dr.) his christian life, its merits
Scotch, a saying of theirs
Scribblers against Spectator, why neglected by

him

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The narrowness and danger of self love Semanthe, her character

5

280 Semiramis, her prodigious works and powers 283 Sempronia, a professed admirer of the French nation

233

The most offensive

Seasons, a dream of them

Self conceit, an inhabitant of the paradise of fools

Self denial, the great foundation of civil virtue Self love transplanted, what

305

gars

Riches corrupt men's morals

464

245

The different degrees of sense in the several different species of animals

·

Ridicule, the talent of ungenerous tempers
Ridicule, the two great branches of, in writing 249 Sentry, (Captain) a member of the Spectator's
Put to a good use
club, his character

445

115 435

His account of a soldier's life

His discourse with a young wrangler in the law

91

No

The match maker

Seneca, his saying of drunkenness

Sense: some men of, more despicable than beg

552

69

620

400

449

491

633 198

409

28

259

460

25

344

223

223

223

229

568

451 473

209

426

451

460

223

609 58

270 447 463

445

582

425

460

248

129 588

404

415

45 437

569

6

519

2

152

197

He receives a letter from Ipswich, giving an account of an engagement between a

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