The Antiquary, Volume 43

Front Cover
Edward Walford, George Latimer Apperson
E. Stock, 1907
 

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Page 270 - To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible, if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish, if it were possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.
Page 185 - With antique pillars massy proof, And storied windows richly dight, Casting a dim religious light. There let the pealing organ blow To the full-voiced quire below In service high and anthems clear As may with sweetness, through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heaven before mine eyes.
Page 215 - The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings : Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade.
Page 293 - I shall do well ;' and taking him in his arms, said, ' Thou hast ever been an honest man, and I hope God will bless thee, and make thee a happy servant to my son, whom I have charged in my letter to continue his love, and trust to you ;' adding, 'I do promise you, that if ever I am restored to my dignity, I will bountifully reward you for both your service and sufferings.
Page 270 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow • warmer among...
Page 139 - Frere's words are well-known and memorable: "....if not particularly objects of curiosity in themselves... must I think be considered in that light, from the situation in which they were found They are, I think, evidently weapons of war, fabricated and used by a people who had not the use of metals.
Page 380 - Dr. Busby ! a great man ! he whipped my grandfather ; a very great man ! I should have gone to him myself, if I had not been a blockhead : a very great man !' " We were immediately conducted into the little chapel on the right hand.
Page 145 - Having been compelled by his necessities to contract, debts, and hunted, as is supposed, by the terriers of the law, he retired to a publick house on Tower-hill, where he is said to have died of want; or, as it is related by one of his biographers, by swallowing, after a long fast, a piece of bread which charity had supplied. He went out, as is reported, almost naked, in the rage of hunger, and, finding a gentleman in a neighbouring...
Page 139 - The situation in which these weapons were found may tempt us to refer them to a very remote period indeed ; even beyond that of the present world...
Page 139 - The manner in which they lie would lead to the persuasion that it was a place of their manufacture and not of their accidental desposit ; and the numbers of them were so great that the man who carried on the brick-work told me that, before he was aware of their being objects of curiosity, he had emptied baskets full of them into the ruts of the adjoining road.

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