Sir Guy d'Esterre, Volume 2; Volume 185

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Page 2 - From all society, from love and hate Of worldly folk; then should he sleep secure, Then wake again, and yield God ever praise, Content with hips and haws and bramble-berry; In contemplation passing out his days, And change of holy thoughts to make him merry. Who when he dies, his tomb may be a bush, Where harmless robin dwells with gentle thrush." " Your majesty's exiled servant,
Page 2 - From a mind delighting in sorrow ; from spirits wasted with passion ; From a heart torn in pieces with care, grief, and travail ; from a man that hateth himself, and all things else that keep him alive; what service can pour Majesty expect, since any service past deserves no more than banishment and proscription to the cursedest of all islands...
Page 281 - Whose gold thread when she saw spun. And the death of her brave son, Thought it safest to retire From all care and vain desire, To a private country cell. Where she spent her days so well, That to her the better sort Came as to a holy court ; And the poor that lived near, Dearth nor famine could not fear.
Page 281 - Whose gold thread when she saw spun, And the death of her brave son, Thought it safest to retire, From all care and vain desire, To a private country cell; Where she spent her days so well, That to her the better sort Came as to an holy court; And the poor that liv-ed near Dearth nor famine could not fear...
Page 286 - Oh ! now it mindeth me that you were one who saw this man elsewhere,' and hereat she dropped a tear, and smote her bosom. She held in her hand a golden cup, which she oft put to her lips; but, in sooth, her heart seemeth too full to lack more filling.
Page 17 - Twas his own voice — she could not err — Throughout the breathing world's extent There was but one such voice for her, So kind, so soft, so eloquent ! Oh, sooner shall the rose of May Mistake her own sweet nightingale, And to some meaner minstrel's lay Open her bosom's glowing veil, Than Love shall ever doubt a tone, A breath of the beloved one!
Page 289 - In the hour of death and in the day of judgment, good Lord, deliver us !'
Page 225 - He that hath eaten bread with me hath lifted up his heel against me.

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