Buddhism: Being a Sketch of the Life and Teachings of Gautama, the Buddha

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Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1887 - 252 pages

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Contents

I
3
III
22
IV
53
V
86
VI
124
VII
150
VIII
178
IX
199
X
212

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Page 38 - Gan thunder, and both ends of Heaven ; the clouds., From many a horrid rift abortive pour'd Fierce rain with lightning mix'd...
Page 173 - ... abroad ; in order that pure religion may last long and be perpetuated, in order that it may continue to be for the good and happiness of the great multitudes, out of pity for the world, to the good and the gain and the weal of gods and men...
Page 234 - Senna, in Lombardy, is said to have been a tree in the time of Julius Caesar; yet the Bo-tree is older than the oldest of these by a century, and would almost seem to verify the prophecy pronounced when it was planted, that it would flourish and be green forever.
Page 135 - Lady, what is this that you say! The living are few, but the dead are many." Then she went to other houses, but one said, "I have lost a son;" another, "I have lost my parents;" another, "I have lost my slave.
Page 82 - Enough Ananda! Do not let yourself be troubled; do not weep! Have I not already, on former occasions, told you that it is in the very nature of all things most near and dear unto us that we must divide ourselves from them, leave them, sever ourselves from them?
Page 110 - ... cultivate love without measure towards all beings. Let him cultivate towards the whole world — above, below, around — a heart of love unstinted, unmixed with the sense of differing or opposing interests. Let a man maintain this inindfulness all the while he is awake, whether he be standing, walking, sitting, or lying down. This state of heart is the best in the world.
Page 38 - Though rooted deep as high, and sturdiest oaks, Bow'd their stiff necks, loaden with stormy blasts, Or torn up sheer.
Page 40 - The philosophy he had trusted in seemed to be doubtful ; the penance he had practised so long had brought no certainty, no peace ; and all his old temptations came back upon him with renewed force. For years he had looked at all earthly good as vanity, worthless and transitory.

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