Soldiering in India

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Contents

I
1
II
13
III
64
IV
79
V
91
VI
115
VII
130
VIII
174
XI
263
XII
307
XIII
324
XIV
377
XV
431
XVI
439
XVII
459
XVIII
528

IX
191
XIX
551

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Page 52 - THOU art, O God ! the life and light Of all this wondrous world we see ; Its glow by day, its smile by night, Are but reflections caught from thee. Where'er we turn thy glories shine, And all things fair and bright are thine.
Page 301 - HUNG be the heavens with black , yield day to night! Comets, importing change of times and states, Brandish your crystal tresses in the sky ; And with them scourge the bad revolting stars, That have consented unto Henry's death ! Henry the fifth, too famous to live long ! England ne'er lost a king of so much worth.
Page 279 - It shall never be inhabited, neither shall it be dwelt in from generation to generation: neither shall the Arabian pitch tent there; neither shall the shepherds make their fold there. But wild beasts of the desert shall lie there; and their houses shall be full of doleful creatures; and owls shall dwell there, and satyrs shall dance there.
Page 410 - Bear me, Pomona ! to thy citron Groves ; To where the Lemon and the piercing Lime, With the deep Orange, glowing through the green, Their lighter glories blend.
Page 197 - MYSTERIOUS Night! when our first parent knew Thee from report divine, and heard thy name, Did he not tremble for this lovely frame, This glorious canopy of light and blue. Yet 'neath a curtain of translucent dew, Bathed in the rays of the great setting flame, Hesperus with the host of heaven came, And lo! creation widened in man's view.
Page 65 - We have to educate a people who cannot at present be educated by means of their mother-tongue. We must teach them some foreign language. The claims of our own language it is hardly necessary to recapitulate.
Page 120 - THEY tell us of an Indian tree, Which, howsoe'er the sun and sky May tempt its boughs to wander free, And shoot, and blossom, wide and high, Far better loves to bend its arms Downward again to that dear earth, From which the life, that fills and warms Its grateful being, first had birth. 'Tis thus, though woo'd by flattering friends, And fed with fame (if fame it be) This heart, my own dear mother, bends, With love's true instinct, back to thee ! LOVE AND HYMEN.
Page 150 - a Brahmana, beginning and ending- a lecture of the Veda, or the recital of any holy strain, must always pronounce to himself the syllable OM ; for unless the syllable Om precede, his learning will slip away from him; and unless it follow, nothing will be retained; or that syllable being prefixed to the several names of worlds, denotes that the seven worlds are manifestations of the power, signified by that syllable.
Page 231 - The gates unfolding pour forth all their train ; Squadrons on squadrons cloud the dusky plain : Men, steeds, and chariots, shake the trembling ground ; The tumult thickens, and the skies resound. And now with shouts the shocking armies closed, To lances lances, shields to shields opposed, Host against host with shadowy legions drew, The sounding darts in iron tempests flew ; Victors and vanquish'd join promiscuous cries, Triumphant shouts and dying groans arise ; With streaming blood the slippery...