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and grief, pleasure and pain, happiness and misery: its faculties boundless, extending themselves through the immensity of space and time; rising up to the throne of God himself, the great sovereign of heaven and earth, and descending to the lowest abysses of hell; recalling past ages, and subjecting them to a present review, and stretching forward to those which lie buried in the womb of futurity; making them as though they were; in a word, comprehending heaven, earth and hell, time and eternity. Such is the nature of that spirit in man, which the almighty Creator “ breathed into his nostrils," when he made him “ a living soul.” From which, let us turn our eyes to a view of that terrible destruction which threatens it, and in which, did not mercy prevent, we must all be involved. But what tongue of man, angel, or damned spirit is able to describe all the terrors of that wrath and fiery indignation which God hath laid up for sinners as the portion of their cup ? — This destruction of the soul is not mere annihilation, the reduction of its powers to a state of non-existence. No, this prospect, gloomy and shocking as it is, were a paradise, to the misery which must be the lot of every unrepenting sinner. The scripture holds it out to us under every image that can convey dread and horror to the mind. It is called “ the second death," that killing death which rends the soul from God for ever. It is termed a prison, a dark and gloomy prison, where peace and rest can never dwell, where hope never comes, from which no possibility of escape is left for the wretched prisoner, and where nothing is to be heard but the voice of “ weeping, and wail"ing, and gnashing of teeth.” To

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the most frightful ideas, it is called “ the lake that $5.burneth with fire and brimstone for ever,” a s bottomless pit,” into which the guilty wretch is still sinking deeper and deeper in misery. But even such representations as these convey but à faint idea of the inexpressible horrors of this dismal state; all the enlarged powers and faculties of the soul above described being made subservient only to the purpose of adding to its misery. And is not redemption from this an endless ground of praise and thanksgiving ? especially if we consider the infinite price that was paid for it, which was no less than the precious blood of the eternal and only begotten Son of God. “ Herein," indeed, “ was love, not that we loved “ God, but that he loved us, and gave his Son to “ die for us, that whosoever believeth in him

might not perish, but have everlasting life.” Let us here again therefore take up the words of the psalmist, « Bless the Lord, O our souls, “ who redeemeth thy life from destruction, and “ crowneth thee with loving-kindness and tender “ mercies.” If ever there was expressive lan. guage this is it: every word is full of the most transporting meaning. The pardon of sin, and redemption from that misery which is the consequence of it, great as they are, do by no means exhaust the plenitude of the love of God, which is no less graciously expressed in the positive blessings he confers upon us; he not only saves from death and hell, but likewise crowns with immortal glory and happiness, bestows a competent portion of the good things of this life in adyance, as an earnest of his love, and a pledge of much greater and better spiritual blessings ber yond death and the grave; nay, is graciously pleased frequently to give his people, even in this life, a foretaste of those rivers of pleasure which flow at his right hand for evermore. These are, in a peculiar sense, the good things the psalmist mentions in the next verse : “ Who satisfieth thy 's mouth with good things, so that thy youth is “ renewed like the eagles." Man, in his natural state, has no desire after spiritual good things, does not see the value, nor feel his need of them; hence we are apt to imagine ourselves “ rich, and .« increased in goods, and standing in need of is nothing," and see not that we are “miserable, “ the second death,” that killing death which rends the soul from God for ever. It is termed a prison, a dark and gloomy prison, where peace and rest can never dwell, where hope never comes, from which no possibility of escape is left for the wretched prisoner, and where nothing is to be heard but the voice of “weeping, and wail“ing, and gnashing of teeth.” To convey the most frightful ideas, it is called “ the lake that $6 burneth with fire and brimstone for ever,” a s bottomless pit," into which the guilty wretch is still sinking deeper and deeper in misery. But even such representations as these convey but à faint idea of the inexpressible horrors of this dismal state; all the enlarged powers and faculties of the soul above described being made subservient only to the purpose of adding to its misery. And is not redemption from this an endless ground of praise and thanksgiving ? especially if we consider the infinite price that was paid for it, which was no less than the precious blood of the eternal and only begotten Son of God. “ Herein," indeed, “ was love, not that we loved “ God, but that he loved us, and gave his Son to “ die for us, that whosoever believeth in him

might not perish, but have everlasting life.” Let us here again therefore take up the words of the psalmist, “ Bless the Lord, ( our souls, eagles, in reality, after a certain revolution of years, I think it is seventy, when they seem to be decaying and drawing near the period of their existence, suddenly recover their health and vigour, and begin, as it were, a new course of life, Whatever be in this, it is very certain that this bird retains the full exercise of all its senses, particularly the sight, to a great old age; and the notion of its growing young again may probably have arisen from the long continuance of its life and strength, compared with those of man; either way, it presents us with a beautiful resemblance of the life of a christian. Of the wicked, it is said, “ they shall not live half their days, but the righ“ teous shall flourish like the palm tree; they shall “ still bring forth fruit in old age, they shall be “ fat and flourishing."--Often, indeed, it appears to be otherwise, and the desponding soul is frequently ready to cry out with Heman, “ My life “ draweth nigh to the grave, I am counted with “ them that go down into the pit; I am as a man « that hath no strength; free among the dead, “ like the slain that lie in the grave, whom thou “ rememberest no more, and they are cut off from “ thy hand :" and with Asaph, in the seventyseventh psalm, “ Will the Lord cast off for ever, « and will he be favourable no more? Is his mercy " clean gone for ever, and doth his promise fail

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