The Works of Jonathan Swift: Containing Additional Letters, Tracts, and Poems, Not Hitherto Published, Volume 3

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Page 59 - The duke was helped toward the cake-house by the ring in Hyde Park (where they fought), and died on the grass, before he could reach the house ; and was brought home in his coach by eight, while the poor duchess was asleep.
Page 77 - Harley dear — in vain ! For him, thou oft hast bid the world attend, Fond to forget the statesman in .the friend; For Swift and him, despis'd the farce of state, The sober follies of the wise and great ; Dextrous, the craving, fawning crowd to quit, And pleas'd to 'scape from flattery to wit.
Page 41 - THERE is not so variable a thing in nature as a lady's head-dress: within my own memory I have known it rise and fall above thirty degrees. About ten 'years ago it shot up to a very great height, insomuch that the female part of our species were much taller than the men. (a) The women were of such an enormous stature, that we appeared as grasshoppers before them.
Page 44 - Medleys are jumbled together with the Flying Post ; the Examiner is deadly sick ; the Spectator keeps up, and doubles its price ; I know not how long it will hold. Have you seen the red stamp the papers are marked with ? Methinks it is worth a halfpenny, the stamping it.
Page 60 - I am infinitely concerned for the poor duke, who was a frank, honest, good-natured man. I loved him very well, and I think he loved me better.
Page 320 - And the serpent cast out of his mouth water as a flood after the woman, that he might cause her to be carried away of the flood. And the earth helped the woman, and the earth opened her mouth, and swallowed up the flood which the dragon cast out of his mouth.
Page 318 - For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, He hath a devil. The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man gluttonous, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners.
Page 77 - scape from Flattery to Wit. Absent or dead, still let a friend be dear, (A sigh the absent claims, the dead a tear) Recall those nights that closed thy toilsome days, Still hear thy Parnell in his living lays, Who, careless now of interest, fame or fate, Perhaps forgets that OXFORD e'er was great; Or, deeming meanest what we greatest call, Beholds thee glorious only in thy fall.
Page 328 - Faith to be agreed upon as aforesaid; and such who profess faith in God the Father, and in Jesus Christ His eternal Son, the true God, and in the Holy Spirit, God co-equal with the Father and the Son, one God blessed for ever, and do acknowledge the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testament to be the revealed Will and Word of God...
Page 11 - ... consist in the various kinds of barbarities which they execute upon their prisoners. Some are celebrated for a happy dexterity in tipping the lion upon them; which is performed by squeezing the nose flat to the face, and boring out the eyes with their fingers...

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