The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

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Talboys and Wheeler ; and W. Pickering, 1825
 

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Page 241 - That they are entitled to life, liberty, and property, and they have never ceded to any sovereign power whatever, a right to dispose of either without their consent.
Page 242 - That by such emigration they by no means forfeited, surrendered, or lost any of those rights, but that they were, and their descendants now are, entitled to the exercise and enjoyment of all such of them, as their local and other circumstances enable them to exercise and enjoy.
Page 264 - We are told, that the subjection of Americans may tend to the diminution of our own liberties : an event, which none but very perspicacious politicians are able to foresee. If slavery be thus fatally contagious, how is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes ? But let us interrupt a while this dream of conquest, settlement, and supremacy.
Page 243 - But, from the necessity of the case, and a regard to the mutual interest of both countries, we cheerfully consent to the operation of such acts of the British parliament, as are bona fide, restrained to the regulation of our external commerce, for the purpose of securing the commercial advantages of the whole empire to the mother country, and the commercial benefits of its respective members ; excluding every idea of taxation internal or external, for raising a revenue on the subjects in America,...
Page 199 - Qu'on parle mal ou bien du fameux Cardinal, Ma prose ni mes vers n'en diront jamais rien : II m'a fait trop de bien pour en dire du mal, II m'a fait trop de mal pour en dire du bien.
Page 83 - It has now been fashionable, for near half a century, to defame and vilify the house of Stuart, and to exalt and magnify the reign of Elizabeth. The Stuarts have found few apologists, for the dead cannot pay for praise; and who will, without reward, oppose the tide of popularity?
Page 487 - God hath necessitated their contentment : but the superior ingredient and obscured part of ourselves, whereto all present felicities afford no resting contentment, will be able at last to tell us, we are more than our present selves, and evacuate such hopes in the fruition of their own accomplishments.
Page 483 - a lady," says Whitefoot, " of such symmetrical proportion to her worthy husband, both in the graces of her body and mind, that they seemed to come together by a kind of natural magnetism.
Page 68 - The only end of writing is to enable the readers better to enjoy life, or better to endure it...
Page 481 - There are many things delivered rhetorically, many expressions therein merely tropical, and as they best illustrate my intention ; and therefore also there are many things to be taken in a soft and flexible sense, and not to be called unto the rigid test of reason.

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