The History of Pennsylvania: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time

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Claxton, Remsen & Haffelfinger, 1869 - 357 pages
 

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Page 268 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 61 - For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power? do that which is good. and thou shalt have praise of the same: for he is a minister of God to thee for good.
Page 51 - ... you shall be governed by laws of your own making, and live a free, and if you will, a sober and industrious people. I shall not usurp the right of any, or oppress his person. God has furnished me with a better resolution, and has given me his grace to keep it.
Page 63 - Governments, like clocks, go from the motion men give them; and as governments are made and moved by men, so by them they are ruined too. Wherefore, governments rather depend upon men than men upon governments. Let men be good and the government cannot be bad; if it be ill, they will cure it. But if men be bad, let the government be never so good they will endeavor to warp and spoil it to their turn.
Page 285 - We are reduced to the alternative of choosing an unconditional submission to the tyranny of irritated ministers, or resistance by force. The latter is our choice. We. have counted the cost of this contest, and find nothing so dreadful as voluntary slavery.
Page 42 - I have, and for my business here, know that after many waitings, watchings, solicitings and disputes in Council, this day my country was confirmed to me under the great seal of England...
Page 50 - FRIENDS: — I wish you all happiness here and hereafter. These are to let you know that it hath pleased God in his providence, to cast you within my lot and care. It is a business, that, though I never undertook before, yet God hath given me an understanding of my duty, and an honest- mind to do it uprightly.
Page 65 - LAWS of this government, to the great end of all government, viz: to support power in reverence with the people, and to secure the people from the abuse of power; that they may be free by their just obedience, and the magistrates honourable for their just administration: for liberty without obedience is confusion, and obedience without
Page 56 - ... any shall offend you or your people, you shall have a full and speedy satisfaction for the same, by an equal number of just men on both sides, that by no means you may have just occasion of being offended against them.
Page 62 - I know what is said by the several admirers of monarchy, aristocracy, and democracy, which are the rule of one, a few, and many, and are the three common ideas of government, when men discourse on that subject.

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