American Journal of Numismatics, and Bulletin of American Numismatic and ArchŠological Societies, Volumes 13-14

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T.R. Marvin & Son, 1879
 

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Page 64 - Resolved, That congress entertain a high sense of the services which Mr. Adams has rendered to the United States, in the execution of the various important trusts which they have from time to time committed to him ; and that the thanks of congress be presented to him, for the patriotism, perseverance, integrity, and diligence with which he hath ably and faithfully served his country.
Page 69 - ... think of certain commodities, easily manageable and safely transportable, and of which the uses are so general and so numerous, that they insured the certainty of always obtaining for them the articles wanted in exchange. The metals, particularly iron and silver and several others, exactly correspond to this description. They were employed, therefore, by general agreement as the ordinary standard of value and the common measure of exchange, being themselves estimated at first by their bulk and...
Page 82 - The Centennial Celebration has attracted particular attention to State history, with the gratifying result that this Commonwealth has not been behind others in providing liberally for the preservation of its true sources. The twenty-nine volumes of Records and Archives (1681-1790) published under the supervision of the late Samuel Hazard, the five volumes of...
Page 69 - ... only in an indirect manner. Almost the only exception is the enormous gold piece struck by Eucratides, king of Bactriana, of which the French possess the only known example. The fact that it is just equal to twenty staters, does not prove that it was ever intended to serve as a coin, against which its size must have been a great objection. Moreover it would appear that very few specimens were struck. Indeed there is some reason to suppose that the French example is the only one ever made, as...
Page 64 - Britain for the infractions of that right. .When, therefore, it was perceived that the same principle was revived with others more novel and extending the injury, instructions were given to the minister plenipotentiary of the United States at the Court of London, and remonstrances duly made by him on this subject, as will appear by documents transmitted herewith.
Page 68 - ... represented in his divine character as descended from Jupiter Ammon, which is indicated by the ram's horns. It would not, however, be fair to modern mints to attribute the comparative poverty of modern coins to want of skill. It is a great convenience that coins should lie flatly one on another, and the greater boldness of ancient coins, however it may add to their beauty, necessarily rendered this impossible. Not only were the Greek coins admirable for their beauty, but they were also- made...
Page 63 - The Subscriber, Minister plenipotentiary from the United States of America, has the honour to represent to the Ministry of His Britannic Majesty, that by the seventh Article of the preliminary treaty of peace between his Majesty and the United States of America, signed at Paris, on the thirtieth day of November, one thousand seven hundred and eighty two, confirmed by the definitive...
Page 60 - The American Art Review: a journal devoted to the practice, theory, history, and archaeology of art.
Page 69 - ... Coins are, of course, very instructive from an historical point of view. Nevertheless it is somewhat remarkable that the Greeks do not seem to have ever struck commemorative medals. Even on their coins they did not for a long time admit any allusions to contemporary events, and then only in an indirect manner. Almost the only exception is the enormous gold piece struck by Eucratides, king of Bactriana, of which the French possess the only known example. The fact that it is just equal to twenty...

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