Physical Life and Higher Light

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A.C. Humphry, printer for the author, 1922 - 149 pages

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Page 79 - And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed into the ground; and should sleep, and rise night and day, and the seed should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how. For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear.
Page 8 - Paradise, and groves Elysian, Fortunate Fields— like those of old Sought in the Atlantic Main— why should they be A history only of departed things, Or a mere fiction of what never was? For the discerning intellect of Man, When wedded to this goodly universe In love and holy passion, shall find these A simple produce of the common day.
Page 47 - For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, He hath a devil. The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man gluttonous, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners.
Page 93 - But the time will come — at last it will — When, Evelyn Hope, what meant, I shall say, In the lower earth, — in the years long still, — That body and soul so pure and gay? Why your hair was amber I shall divine, And your mouth of your own geranium's red, — And what you would do with me, in fine, In the new life come in the old one's stead. I have lived, I shall say, so much since then, Given up myself so many times, Gained me the gains of various men, Ransacked the ages, spoiled the climes...
Page 100 - SOME murmur, when their sky is clear And wholly bright to view, If one small speck of dark appear In their great heaven of blue. And some with thankful love are filled, If but one streak of light, One ray of God's good mercy gild The darkness of their night.
Page 54 - Sixteen years old when she died ! Perhaps she had scarcely heard my name — It was not her time to love ; beside, Her life had many a hope and aim, Duties enough and little cares, And now was quiet, now astir — Till God's hand beckoned unawares, And the sweet white brow is all of her.
Page 123 - Wouldst thou the young year's blossoms and the fruits of its decline, And all by which the soul is charmed, enraptured, feasted, fed, Wouldst thou the earth and heaven itself in one sole name combine ? I name thee, O Sakuntala,- and all at once is) said.
Page 47 - Behold, I will send you Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the Lord ; and he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse.
Page 147 - The future of poetry is immense, because in poetry, where it is worthy, of its high destinies, our race, as time goes on, will find an ever surer and surer stay.
Page 148 - Our religion has materialised itself in the fact, in the supposed fact; it has attached its emotion to the fact, and now the fact is failing it. But for poetry the idea is everything ; the rest is a world of illusion, of divine illusion. Poetry attaches its emotion to the idea; the idea is the fact. The strongest part of our religion to-day is its unconscious poetry.

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