An outline of the necessary laws of thought, by W. Thomson

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Page 53 - He heard it, but he heeded not, — his eyes Were with his heart, and that was far away. He recked not of the life he lost, nor prize; But where his rude hut by the Danube lay, There were his young barbarians all at play, There was their Dacian mother, — he, their sire, Butchered to make a Roman holiday! — All this rushed with his blood. — Shall he expire, And unavenged? Arise, ye Goths, and glut your ire!
Page 52 - I see before me the Gladiator lie: He leans upon his hand — his manly brow Consents to death, but conquers agony, And his drooped head sinks gradually low — And through his side the last drops, ebbing slow From the red gash, fall heavy, one by one, Like the first of a thunder-shower; and now The arena swims around him — he is gone, Ere ceased the inhuman shout which hailed...
Page 53 - Were with his heart, and that was far away ; He recked not of the life he lost, nor prize ; But where his rude hut by the Danube lay, There were his young barbarians all at play, There was their Dacian mother, — he, their sire, Butchered to make a Roman holiday.
Page i - An Outline of the necessary Laws of Thought : A Treatise on Pure and Applied Logic. By WILLIAM THOMSON, DD New Edition.
Page 342 - ... have a unanimous agreement of strong analogies, merely because we do not see how such a cause can produce the effect, or even can exist under the circumstances of the case. 4th. That contrary or opposing facts are equally instructive for the discovery of causes with favourable ones. 5th. That causes will very frequently become obvious, by a mere arrangement of our facts in the order of intensity in which some peculiar quality subsists; though not of necessity because counteracting or modifying...
Page 252 - ... thought becomes secondary, nor any secondary primary. All M is P All S is M . • . All S is P The conclusion no way disturbs the order of terms established in the premisses. But in the second figure, the order is somewhat disturbed ; the subject of the conclusion was indeed a subject in the premisses, but the predicate was not a predicate. No P is M All S is M .-. No...
Page 34 - ... by the tradesman, under that of one whose patronage is valuable. Now the object is really the same to all these observers; the same "rich man" has been represented under all these different forms.
Page 345 - The enquiry into the cause of sound had led to conclusions respecting its mode of propagation, from which its velocity in the air could be precisely calculated. The calculations were performed ; but, when compared with fact, though the agreement was quite sufficient to show the general correctness of the cause and mode of propagation assigned, yet the whole velocity could not be shown to arise from this theory. There was still a residual velocity to be accounted for, which placed dynamical philosophers...
Page 3 - Geometry ; where it is proved, that the fquare of the hypothenufe, or longeft fide of a right-angled triangle, is equal to the fum of the fquares of the bafe and perpendicular, or the other two fides.
Page iii - TO SIR WILLIAM HAMILTON, BART. PROFESSOR OF LOGIC AND METAPHYSICS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, ETC. ETC.

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