Walks in Oxford;: Comprising an Original, Historical, and Descriptive Account of the Colleges, Halls, and Public Buildings of the University: with an Introductory Outline of the Academical History of Oxford. To which are Added, a Concise History and Description of the City, and Delineations in the Environs of Oxford, Part 1

Front Cover
W. Baxter, 1818 - 388 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 163 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the...
Page 133 - Like Leaves on Trees the Race of Man is found, Now green in Youth, now with'ring on the Ground, Another Race the following Spring supplies, They fall successive, and successive rise; So Generations in their Course decay, So flourish these, when those are past away.
Page 133 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground; Another race the following spring supplies; They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay; So flourish these, when those are pass'd away. But if thou still persist to search my birth, Then hear a tale that fills the spacious earth. "A city stands on Argos...
Page 163 - That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow • warmer among the ruins of lona.
Page 140 - No more the matchless skill I call unkind, That strives to disenchant my cheated mind. For when again I view thy chaste design, The just proportion, and the genuine line; Those native portraitures of Attic art, That from the lucid surface seem to start; Those tints, that steal no glories from the day, Nor ask the sun to lend his streaming ray...
Page 248 - Genera, which he had got half printed from Holland, to be written against him ; but he afterwards detained him a month, without leaving Linnaeus an hour to himself the whole day long , and at last took leave of him with tears in his eyes, after having given him the choice of living with him till his death, as the salary of the Professorship was sufficient for them both.
Page 85 - This is the emblem of a good tutor or fellow of a college, who is set to watch over the youth of the society, and by whose prudence they are to be led through the dangers of their first entrance into the world.
Page 337 - Near the Village of BLENHEIM, On the Banks of the Danube, BY JOHN DUKE of MARLBOROUGH, The Hero not only of his Nation, but of his Age...
Page 169 - J516, recites that the founder, to the praise and honour of God Almighty, the most holy body of Christ, and the blessed Virgin Mary, as also of the apostles Peter, Paul, and Andrew, and of St. Cuthbert and St.
Page 337 - Monument deiigned to perpetuate the Memory of the Signal Viftory Obtained over the French and Bavarians, Near the Village of Blenheim, On the Banks of the Danube, By JOHN Duke of...

Bibliographic information