Chambers's pocket miscellany, Volume 22

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Page 147 - Lord, thou hast given me a cell Wherein to dwell ; A little house, whose humble roof Is weather-proof; Under the spars of which I lie Both soft, and dry...
Page 179 - Behold how good and joyful a thing it is for brethren to dwell together in unity.
Page 72 - ... so that each of the young men lights upon a girl that he calls his valentine, and each of the girls upon a young man which she calls hers. By this means each has two valentines • but the man sticks faster to the valentine that is fallen to him, than to the valentine to whom he is fallen. Fortune having thus divided the company into so many couples, the valentines give balls and treats to their mistresses, wear their billets several days upon their bosoms or sleeves, and this little sport often...
Page 147 - LORD, thou hast given me a cell Wherein to dwell, A little house, whose humble roof Is weatherproof, Under the spars of which I lie Both soft and dry ; Where thou, my chamber for to ward. Hast set a guard Of harmless thoughts, to watch and keep ! Me while I sleep. Low is my porch, as is my fate, Both void of state ; And yet the threshold of my door < Is worn by th' poor, Who thither come and freely get Good words or meat.
Page 109 - After these and other words, he unrolled the parchment, and by means of the same interpreter, conveyed to them, article by article, the conditions of the purchase and the words of the compact then made for their eternal Union. Among other things, they were not to be molested in their lawful pursuits, even in the territory they had alienated, for it was to be common to them and the English. They were to have the same liberty to do all things therein relating to the improvement of their grounds, and...
Page 148 - ... plenty-dropping hand That soils my land, And giv'st me, for my bushel sown, Twice ten for one ; Thou mak'st my teeming hen to lay Her egg each day ; Besides, my healthful ewes to bear Me twins each year ; The while the conduits of my kine Run cream, for wine : All these, and better, thou dost send Me, to this end, — That I should render, for my part...
Page 107 - My dear wife ! Remember thou wast the love of my youth, and much the joy of my life; the most beloved as well as most worthy of all my earthly comforts; and the reason of that love was more thy inward than thy outward excellencies, which yet were many.
Page 72 - An equal number of maids and bachelors get together, each writes their true or some feigned name upon separate billets, which they roll up, and draw by way of lots, the maids taking the men's billets, and the men the maids...
Page 108 - ... outward excellencies, which yet were many. God knows, and thou knowest it, I can say it was a match of Providence's making; and God's image in us both was the first thing, and the most amiable and engaging ornament in our eyes. Now I am to leave thee, and that without knowing whether I shall ever see thee more in this world, take my counsel into thy bosom, and let it dwell with thee in my stead while thou livest.
Page 77 - Februalis, and Februlla. On this occasion, amidst a variety of ceremonies, the names of young women were put into a box, from which they were drawn by the men as chance directed. The pastors of the early Christian church, who, by every possible...

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