Regimental Coventry; as it is at present acted upon in the British army

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Page 64 - Because you are not merry: and 'twere as easy For you to laugh and leap and say you are merry, Because you are not sad. Now, by two-headed Janus, Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time: Some that will evermore peep through their eyes And laugh like parrots at a bag-piper, And other of such vinegar aspect That they'll not show their teeth in way of smile, Though Nestor swear the jest be laughable.
Page 755 - And I at times have found the struggle hard, And thought of shaking off my bonds of clay : But now I fain would for a time survive, If but to see what next can well arrive.
Page 206 - I am to acquaint you, that his royal highness the prince regent has been pleased, in the name and on the behalf of his majesty, to approve and confirm the finding -and sentence of the court.
Page 753 - IT has always been the practice of mankind, to judge of actions by the event. The same attempts, conducted in the same manner, but terminated by different success, produce different judgments : they who attain their wishes, never want celebrators of their wisdom and their virtue ; and they that miscarry, are quickly discovered to have been defective not only in mental but in moral qualities. The world...
Page 525 - I told you so," Ulter'd by friends, those prophets of the past, Who, 'stead of saying what you now should do, Own they foresaw that you would fall at last, And solace your slight lapse 'gainst " bonos mores," With a long memorandum of old stories.
Page 326 - The Spirit, in sincerity, Which other men are tempted to, And at the devil's instance do ; And yet the actions be contrary, Just as the saints and wicked vary.
Page 691 - These were their learned speculations, And all their constant occupations, To measure wind, and weigh the air, And turn a circle to a square ; To make a powder of the sun, By which all doctors should b...
Page 566 - The value of every story depends on its being true. A story is a picture either of an individual or of human nature in general : if it be false, it is a picture of nothing.
Page 240 - For any length of days in such a pickle. To strive, too, with our fate were such a strife As if the corn-sheaf should oppose the sickle : Men are the sport of circumstances, when The circumstances seem the sport of men.
Page 443 - But when we in our viciousness grow hard, (O misery on't !) the wise gods seel our eyes In our own filth; drop our clear judgments; make us Adore our errors ; laugh at us while we strut To our confusion.

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