Loudon's Architectural Magazine, Volume 4

Front Cover
John Claudius Loudon
Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1837
 

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Page 435 - England, with all thy faults, I love thee still — My country ! and, while yet a nook is left, Where English minds and manners may be found, Shall be constrain'd to love thee.
Page 45 - This Church was erected in the year 1835, containing 323 sittings; and, in consequence of a grant from the Incorporated Society for promoting the enlargement, building, and repairing of churches and chapels, 193 of that number are hereby declared to be free and unappropriated for ever.
Page 429 - THERE is a calm for those who weep, A rest for weary pilgrims found, They softly lie and sweetly sleep Low in the ground.
Page 245 - The architects of all the sacred edifices of the Latin Church, wherever such arose, — north, south, east, or west, — thus derived their science from the same central school ; obeyed in their designs the same hierarchy; were directed in their constructions by the same principles of propriety and taste; kept up with each other in the most distant parts to which they might be sent, the most constant correspondence ; and rendered every minute improvement the property of the whole body, and...
Page 346 - ... be taken by Commissioners of Sewers in general with regard to their Qualification, and without being liable to the Forfeiture or Penalty herein-before imposed upon Commissioners of Sewers in general for acting without being qualified as aforesaid, or without having taken such Oath or Affirmation...
Page 425 - While those deputed to inter the slain Heap with a rising pyramid the plain. A hundred foot in length, a hundred wide, The growing structure spreads on every side; High on the top the manly corse they lay, And well-fed sheep, and sable oxen slay: Achilles...
Page 504 - ... therefore, to endeavour to illustrate the principle from the neglect of which these abuses have arisen ; that of unity of feeling, the basis of all grace, the essence of all beauty. We shall consider the architecture of nations as it is influenced by their feelings and manners, as it is connected with the scenery in which it is found, and with the skies under which it was erected ; we shall be led as much to the street and the cottage as to the temple and the tower ; and shall be more interested...
Page 345 - AND lastly, it is hereby declared and agreed by and between the said parties to these presents, that in case the said...
Page 552 - A few square feet of garden, and a latched wicket, persuading the weary and dusty pedestrian, with expressive eloquence, to lean upon it for an instant, and request a drink of water or milk, complete a picture, which, if it be far enough from London to be unspoiled by town sophistications, is a very perfect thing in its way. The ideas it awakens are agreeable ; and the architecture is all that we want in such a situation. It is pretty and appropriate; and, if it boasted of any other perfection, it...
Page 126 - Not to mention, that the same excellence of faculties which contributes to the improvement of reason, the same clearness of conception, the same exactness of distinction, the same vivacity of apprehension, are essential to the operations of true taste, and are its infallible concomitants.

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